Author: Audrey Gámez

Marketing ≠ $$$$, and Why That’s Better for Artists

Figure Drawing Manequin embracing a figure that says play to the gallery.
Well maybe not play. But how well are you “dating” your key stakeholders?

I’ve been traveling for the last week to a conference in Austin, and as often happens with work trips, I’m brimming with resources and ideas. The Association of Performing Arts Service Organizations (or APASO) is unique in that it’s for all of the organizations who serve individual performing artists and other performing arts organization. Like C4, their primary purpose isn’t necessarily to present or produce art, but to provide services and resources to the field.

While there, I met with a group of folks working in adult education and professional development training from around the U.S. Most of us worked with individual artists by providing workshops or trainings in things similar to what C4 offers: business planning, understanding your career needs, fundraising, budgeting and finance, fiscal sponsorship and more.

And one thing we all seemed to land on: Marketing is perhaps one of the most misunderstood concepts that we teach. And yet it is also one of the most common things that artists say they need.

At C4, we often see marketing listed on our surveys as one of the concepts in which artists want more training. So we have a marketing class, AIM Atlanta, which provides artists with the tools to determine their market. AIM is also designed to walk artists through creating a marketing plan based on their current size and budget using tools/techniques they can put into practice immediately. But when artists show up for class, they often say their primary motivation in taking the class is learning how they can make more money by selling their art.

Let me be clear: Marketing is not selling. Marketing and sales are different tools you need to run your business. BUT marketing and sales are both important and feed off one another. Sales is a component of marketing but it is not interchangeable by definition or function with marketing.

What I’m not saying is that you shouldn’t take a marketing program if your goal is to grow your sales. But I’m a fan of realistic expectations when it comes to career growth. And in order to make sure you set realistic expectations, it’s important to know what you need and what you’re asking for.

So hopefully, the following info can help with getting the most out of marketing programs and education such as our AIM program.

2 figures in a statue putting their heads together romantically.
Romance isn’t dead. It’s alive and well in marketing.

WHAT IS MARKETING?

Marketing, in the simplest definition possible, is relationship building. And if you think of it like dating, it makes total sense. Sometimes you date folks, and it leads to a fruitful relationship in which both of you mutually benefit. In the marketing world, a fruitful relationship might be getting larger appeal for your work, write ups in journalism, patrons that are loyal and return buyers.

Sometimes you date folks and realize that they aren’t for you. There’s lots of reasons for this, but at the core, no one person is right for everybody. Likewise, as much as we would like to believe that art holds universal appeal, that doesn’t mean every artist’s work will appeal to every person. And it’s ok that it doesn’t. Imagine dating all 7.6 Billion folks that currently walk this planet. HOLY MOLY GUACAMOLE (did I mention I was just in Texas?)…that’s a lot of dates. Dating, as with marketing, takes time, energy and maintenance. Dating that many people at once would be exhausting. Likewise, marketing to the masses also takes a lot of time, energy, maintenance and resources (read: MONEY!!). That’s a long list of things most of us artists tend to be deficient in most of the time. Competing with someone else who does have those resources puts you at a huge disadvantage. So how can artists and small arts businesses compete?

Never fear! Just as you wouldn’t go out with every single person you see on Tinder, you also shouldn’t treat your business marketing that way either. Think of your dating “type” (and I do use that word in the LOOSEST sense possible to demonstrate this analogy) as what we would refer to as a marketing persona. Personas are based on who has been interested in your work before, and who might be interested in your work in the future. Why target folks who ALREADY seem poised to be into your work vs. those who aren’t familiar yet? It’s likely to take less of your resources initially to convert a customer who already demonstrates interest. And most of us don’t have the time and money it takes to launch a brand loyalty campaign that would make us attractive to folks who weren’t our “type” in the first place. Not to say that those folks definitely won’t be interested. But when time and money are in short supply, go with trying to find the folks in your market who are already interested in what it is that you do or create. From there, you can begin to branch out, and those “early adopters” will be your best advocates to the customers/stakeholders who don’t know you as well. Think of this as your best friend who tells everyone how great you are.

You end up with a great relationship through hard work and building trust. Likewise a great marketing relationship is built on spending time to earn your market’s trust. Trust requires constantly showing up and being consistent. Your work as an artist should reflect a consistency on which your stakeholders can rely. Being dependable in what you offer, how you offer it, how you present yourself – it all matters in building a relationship with your market. Just like it all matters in how you build a relationship with another human being. And some of the same rules apply: be the best version of yourself, treat people well, present yourself genuinely and be honest. Marketing isn’t about tricking people – it’s about finding the ways in which they authentically connect with what you already offer.

Sales is the act of actually trading a good or commodity for money. It may or may not be based on having a good relationship, and it is dollars focused.

The best businesses know that a good marketing strategy and hard work over time to implement it can pay off in sales. And that is where I would like to identify an opportunity for realistic expectations about your marketing. It takes time to get to the sales part. It takes effort and intention. And if you’re patient, over time you can hope to begin to see increased sales and interest in your work based on the strong relationships you have built. But without putting in the work, the payoff isn’t as secure. And, it isn’t an overnight happening.

Build a following that really hearts your art to the core. Genuine marketing can help strengthen the artistic connection to your work.

FORMING THE RELATIONSHIP

Here’s the best part: focusing on relationship building instead of sales is WAY better for artists. Why? Well for starters, the value of our work is not based on it’s material worth but on the relationship that our patrons have with what we are trying to present. They aren’t paying for 1 paintbrush, a half pint of green paint, a couple splashes of blue, some graphite pencil, and a piece of canvas attached to some wood. They’re paying for a connection to a greater understanding of connection of heritage and culture of our ancestors to the present day. Or maybe they are into your work because of the symbology that is significant in their own life, too. That relationship to the subject matter of your work is a powerful one. And that is the most genuine and honest value on which you can form the basis of a solid relationship that will lead somewhere mutually beneficial for the both of you.

So, what do you do to find the person who wants what you have to give? Focus on incorporating that relationship foundation into all aspects of what you share and do. Don’t just have a Facebook page: have a page curated with topics and posts that related directly to the work you do. With your website and logo, pick fonts, colors, images and layouts the express the kind of experience someone might have with your work. Flyers for a performance? Again, give your audience some kind of indication of the experience to be had through what you are handing them to get there. Let your marketing materials speak for you when you aren’t there to explain yourself. And stay connected by giving your audience multiple ways to engage with you through email newsletters, responding to comments, regularly updating social media, blogging and more. Remember how much your significant other hates when you don’t call? So does your following. Feed that connection regularly as a part of your day-to-day business operations. Some artists even approach these communication channels as another creation opportunity. Others see it as a means of connection to a community outside their studio/work environment when what you do requires being sequestered from the rest of the world for long stretches of time to create.

So many of us get into the arts for reasons that are not money, so it’s somewhat surprising to see how focused it we sometimes become when asked about growing our careers. And I get it, because at the end of the day, we all need a means to pay our bills and our rent. But I challenge you to change up your focus from making more money off of your art to building stronger relationships with your market that can lead to increased revenue. Long term, the work you put in now can benefit you over the lifetime of your career.

C4 Atlanta focuses on this type of relationship building in our AIM (Artists In the Marketplace) class. Marketing is an important skill for every artists, whether you’re doing your thing as a freelancer on your own or as part of an organization/collective. Understanding how to build relationships with your work is essential to building your arts career and building sales. Over four weeks, we’ll dive deep into the tools artists with small marketing budgets can use to do this. As you grow, your tools and techniques can be scaled along with you. At the end of four weeks, you’ll walk away with a fully fleshed out plan for marketing your artwork based on your own creative offering. Join us this May for AIM. Click here to register or find out more about this program.

 

Five Reasons Why You ABSOLUTELY Need A Website Right Now

As a professional artist myself, I’m all about embracing what makes our work unique in our marketing and branding practices. Utilizing your creative DNA in this way isn’t just smart, it’s essential. The more customized you can make all aspects of your customer’s interaction with you, the more he or she will feel connected to your artist brand. We know the look and feel of our favorite brands or companies before we even see their newest products based on how they have cultivated their presence. Tone of voice, language, color, font and style all share the details of what we can expect. As artists, we inherently understand this about our creative work. And many of us work hard to cultivate this creative voice.

Yet unfortunately, taking this highly customized approach to managing online presence is something artists can often neglect. Sure, I know lots of you spend time cultivating your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat as if it was a MOMA exhibition. We agonize over hashtags and make sure to like and chime in on every comment. But how many of you spend that kind of time on your website? Better yet, do you even have one?

Why in the name of Instagram do we even need websites anymore anyway? Aren’t they irrelevant? You can sell work through Facebook and Instagram, share live feeds through Facebook Live, meet new fans through Soundcloud, and use those fun bunny filters in Snapchat. So what do I still need a website for anyway?

One thing you still can’t do on the Instaface? Brand everything directly to yourself. At the end of the day, Facebook still feels and looks like Facebook, even with all the apps, features, filters, and functions you could ever have. It’s not built with you in mind. Not only are websites relevant, they can enhance and boost your social media following if they are well maintained. But left to rot in the netherworlds of the interwebz….Well, we’ve all seen those artists who haven’t updated their sites since Geocities was still a thing. Don’t know what Geocities is? You probably still need a website.

Image result for website funny

Not convinced? Here’s a list of 4 reasons you need a website (or a website upgrade for you Geocities folks) right now. #LetsDoThis

  1. You need a home for your work. Think of your website as your online address. Just like your real home has furniture that you love and walls painted in colors that make you feel good, so, too, should your website look and feel like you and your work. Fonts, colors, photos and logos can say a LOT about you before your customer ever makes it to your “About Me” page. Everything should look and feel like your work, and the more it does, the more your customer will connect with you. You know what I’m talking about – there are those places you like to browse or shop just because it feels good to be in their space. You like the environment. Give your customers the same feeling when they come to visit you.
  2. Facebook isn’t made for you – or your customers. As great as social media platforms are for interacting with an audience and sharing content, they offer a cookie cutter platform that isn’t tailor made to the needs of you or your audience. Social media platforms also don’t play well with others. Content shared from one platform to another doesn’t have the same traction as if it’s organically shared within the platform. Functionality is constantly changing. Your own website allows you to host the features and content that are specific to you are your work, without other distractions competing for your customer’s attention.
  3. It makes you look like a professional. Having a website makes you seem like someone who has their …ahem…STUFF together. Having everything laid out in a format that’s easy to navigate for your customer makes you seem like you have thought through their buying/experience process before. The easier it is for a customer to find the information about you that they’re looking for, the more trusted you become in their eyes. If information is hard to find because it’s between several different platforms, it’s gonna look like you don’t know what you’re doing. And buyers aren’t the only ones looking. Are you applying for residencies, grants, awards, exhibitions, shows or any other kind of work? It’s guaranteed that folks who book and work with artists are also looking to see what you look like online to know whether or not they should risk working with you.
  4. People want to know how to contact you. This is my biggest pet peeve with professional artists. Have you ever found someone’s work that you just loved only to never be able to find them anywhere else ever again? No cards, no phone number, no email address…nothing. You hope maybe one day you can find them at a festival around town, but that’s a longshot. Don’t be that person. Have a home for your work online and a place where people can find out how to contact you. Another word of advice? Contact forms are great, but have a REAL email address or phone number available, too, just in case. Sometimes “Contact Me” forms aren’t the easiest way for folks to send you information. And you want people to be able to get in touch if they want to know more about you and your work. You can always get a separate business email or Google Voice number to keep your personal contact info separate.
  5. New and different is attractive. Updating your site regularly with new information, new work, and new content helps to keep folks coming back again and again. Train your audience to use your site as a platform for finding out new information by driving traffic from your other social media accounts and email marketing. Updating your website regularly also helps to show folks that your constantly working as an artist, which inspires trust and confidence in the value of your work. Remember that Geocities artist with the website from 1998? Who knows if that person is even still working anymore? Make keeping your site up to date a part of regular part of your creative work.

Image result for website funny

Need a helpful hand to help you take the first step? Never fear, C4 Atlanta is here! A new Website Bootcamp class is starting on Tuesday, April 17, 2018. Over four weeks, you’ll learn how to build an attractive, easy to use site for yourself that you can easily update and maintain on your own. We’ll also cover some basic user design info, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and a little content marketing to help you drive traffic to your site. If all of this still sounds scary, we promise that there is a lot of hands-on work and facilitator feedback in this course to build your confidence.

Join us for Website Bootcamp!

Date/Time: Tuesdays, April 17 – May  8, 2018 – 10:30am -1:30pm

Location: Fuse Arts Center

Cost: $125 for non-members, $100 for members Register Online Here

For more information or to register, visit: Website Bootcamp Course Page.

C4 Atlanta Welcomes Somalia Ra-min

Somalia Ra-min
Somalia Ra-min

We are excited to announce that C4 Atlanta has welcomed a new member to our team. Meet Somalia Ra-min! Somalia joins the C4 Atlanta team as Administrative Assistant to the Membership and Education programs.  Though still early in her arts career, Somalia is already killing it as a performing artist in Atlanta. Get to know our newest addition to the C4 Action Team below:

 

Tell us about your education!

Performing in the cast of Six Flags’ “Because It’s Christmas”

I’m currently a senior at Spelman College, studying Women’s Studies with a concentration in performing arts. I’ve been involved in the performing arts since I was in elementary school. My areas of training include voice, dance, and drama. Some of the highlights of my career include performing back up for Jazz Vocalist Kathleen Bertrand, performing in Six Flags Over Georgia theater shows, and performing at the 2017 Taste of Soul music festival.

Where are you originally from and why are you in Atlanta (if you aren’t originally from here)? 

I’m originally from Jersey City, New Jersey but I grew up in Lithonia, Georgia. I’m in Atlanta because the majority of my family lives here, I attend college here, and Atlanta influences everything!

Performing backup for jazz vocalist Kathleen Bertrand.

What is your favorite food?

Any type of southern comfort food!

Dre the Cat enjoying some down time with his mom.

Favorite Artists?

Jill Scott, Nao, Marvin Gaye, Maxwell, Erykah Badu, and Beyonce.

Favorite Quote?

I will experience many defeats in life but I will never be defeated.

 Dogs or Cats?

I have a cat named Dre!

What is C4 doing in 5 years

In 5 years C4 Atlanta will be throwing it’s first conference, creating a platform to spread the knowledge to a wider audience and to showcase the art of  their passionate members.

Weirdest dream?

That I lived a life with no bills lol.

In concert at the Music Room.
In concert at the Music Room.

 

Fireside Chats: Artists Thrive!

C4 Atlanta’s work has always been focused on the needs of the arts worker to carve out a career in Atlanta. Beyond skill and talent, there is a lot necessary to sustain a career as an artist, arts technician or administrator. Our scope of service has been based on providing a platform accessible to any artist of skills, resources, and tools for professional development regardless of educational level, previous experience, discipline or demographics.

This is a constant conversation in our office: what do artists need, and how are they receiving it (or not receiving it) in Atlanta? Recently, we’ve been focused on the way that our organization is able to connect artists to causes, issues and resources. Our advocacy efforts over the last year focused on the Presidential and Local elections have centered on providing more connectivity and access between our community to policy makers and the community systems that influence how, where, and why we are able to work. As we’ve worked over the last year on this specific initiative, we’ve seen how this work has been beneficial to artists in other, unexpected ways. We’ve seen culture workers who would not know each other otherwise as collaborators and activists for causes and visions of change.

We’d like to continue and incubate these connections to grow and flourish, without agenda or expectation that we are “here to get it done” – in an hour and a half. While we always wish to move the needle toward goals and ideals that can help the creatives in this city have stronger careers, sometimes, idea sharing, a chance at greater understanding and place to congregate is the most important tool we could provide. In this way, our goal is to provide the tools and get out of the way to allow artists to organically utilize them in a way that is most beneficial to their own goals.

With this in mind, we present our newest initiative: Fireside Chats. Fireside Chats are essentially a series of conversations, lead by the issues identified by artists as most important and in need of discussion. Our goal here is not to promise problem solving – though if consensus was reached or an action agreed upon, great. Rather, we are focusing on curating a space where artists can talk about things that they care about or that affect them, learn and share with other artists and have a space to meet one another. We plan to hold these conversations monthly in our space. And while we don’t promise to solve all of our issues in an hour and a half, we do promise to provide snacks!

C4 Atlanta held the first of these conversations on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Our future goal is to theme the discussions based on topics chosen by attendees at previous Fireside Chats. But for this first conversation, we decided to focus on a national initiative for organizations that work with artists to measure whether their operations help artists to flourish or quit: Artists Thrive.

Artists Thrive includes a website with a rubric measurement tool of both artists and organizations that work with artists. Visit artiststhrive.org to learn more.

Artists Thrive is a national initiative, organized by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, researched and crafted by a leadership team from across the United States. C4 Atlanta’s own Executive Director was part of the leadership team and recently helped with an unveiling of these tools and resources at a summit in Berea, Kentucky this fall.

At the Fireside Chat, Jessyca Holland shared the goals of the leadership team and invited participating artists and arts workers to share their thoughts about what needs they had and their impression of the Artists Thrive tools.

Before we showed local artists the tool, we asked, “what do you need in Atlanta to thrive”? Here is what they said:

  • Time – artists need collaborating entities to understand how much time in really takes for the production of art. This is not a time-management issue. It is a communication issue between artist and contractor/patron/employer. Artists need time for the full cycle of creation and production.
  • Money – we got into a discussion about value and price but the conversation seemed to center around the need for money to support (once again) the full cycle of creation and production–not just output. For example: grants that fund process as well as product (yes, we know that word but language is hard).
  • Fair wage for fair time.
  • Vocabulary to be able to express fair value.
  • Transparency.
  • Relationship building opportunities.
  • Peer networks.
  • Shared vision with those who work with artists. An understanding of expectations.
  • Capacity resources.
  • Greater tolerance for risk – allow artists to create interesting work that pushes thought and/or boundaries. An environment that fosters innovation and new works.
  • More supporters.
Artists thrive
Artists discuss fair wage, time, and other resources they need to thrive.

We also asked artists about topics they would like to discuss at future fireside chats. Here’s what they said:

  • Artists & Developers – space
  • Artists as tools of gentrification
  • Artists at the table
  • Artists as freelancers
  • Entertainment vs. design vs. fine art vs. folk art
  • Tangible value vs. intangible value
  • Art as a public good. Is art for everyone?

What else? Email us at actionteam@c4atlanta.org with your ideas!

The Candidates + ATL Artists

I'm a Georgia Voter StickerWe need your help in getting the word out about the importance of art and artists in our city’s future. Here’s how you can help:

  1. Encourage Candidates to Answer the Questionnaire About the Arts. C4 Atlanta has released a short questionnaire to all candidates running for Atlanta City Council, City Council President and Mayor for which we could find contact information. C4 intends to publish any and all answers provided by candidates or their campaigns on our blog. Here are the questions that we’ve asked the candidates:
  • Who do you consider Atlanta’s Cultural leaders?
  • Considering such models as L.A. and Detroit (to name a few) that incorporate artists into planning and city government, what presence do you see for local artists in city government work beyond Contracts for Arts Services through OCA, Elevate, and city commissions?
  • For City Council Candidates: How do you plan to work with fellow council members and the Mayor’s Office to protect the ways artists work in this city? (Some initiatives on our radar: removing barriers to small business development for artists and entrepreneurs; protection of free speech; freelancer benefits similar to NYC)?
  • For Mayoral Candidates: How do you plan to work with city council to protect the ways artists work in this city? (Some initiatives on our radar: removing barriers to small business development for artists and entrepreneurs; protection of free speech; freelancer benefits similar to NYC)?
  • How do you plan to include individual artists/freelancers in policies and programs to provide affordable housing and workspace?

Help us get the word out to your candidates! You can help us encourage the candidates that you care about to answer by tagging them in our social media posts. Let them know that you care about these issues and the future of artists in Atlanta. Tag our posts on C4 Atlanta’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

Our Executive Director Jessyca Holland recently wrote a great blog post about the importance of artists votes in the upcoming election. You can read it here.

2) Attend Fireside Chat: Election Edition – and bring a friend! Join us for our upcoming Fireside Chat: Election Edition on November 2 at 6:00pm. Fun and joy promised, and information assured! C4 believes that the voting process can be BOTH fun and informational. We’ll be convening artists to discuss the questions and answers provided by candidates to our questionnaire, along with what you believe to be the biggest issues in the upcoming elections for artists. In addition, we promise snacks, button making, a little last minute info about where and how to vote, and maybe even an extra surprise or two thrown in just for grins. Artists Jessica Caldas and Haylee Anne will be joining to talk about their exhibition and project Goldsmack at Eyedrum related to this election. This is a chance for our community to convene one last time before we head to the polls to decide the future of Atlanta Arts and Culture workers. RSVP for the event here. You can share this event with your friends on Facebook here.

 

Fireside Chat: Election Edition

Date/Time: November 2, 2017 – 6:00pm-9:00pm RSVP Now

Location: Fuse Arts Center, inside the M. Rich Center for Creative Arts, Media and Technology, 115 Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr SW, Atlanta, GA 30303 Click Here for Directions to Fuse

Cost: Free, but you must RSVP. RSVP Online Here

For questions or more information, please contact actionteam@c4atlanta.org.

C4 Atlanta is a 501(c)3 nonprofit and does not endorse or recommend any candidate for any position. The purpose of these events is to share information within the arts community so that artists in Atlanta can make informed choices at the polls based on their personal values and beliefs.

C4 Atlanta is proud recipient of a grant through Our Future Atlanta to fund this project. The purpose of our grant proposal is to encourage discussion and voting by Atlanta artists about the November local elections. Our grant aligns with Our Future Atlanta’s focus area on Arts and Cultural Diversity. To learn more about Our Future Atlanta, visit: ourfutureatlanta.org 

 

TechsmARTs Podcast: The Modern Day Actor

During the last week of each month, C4 Atlanta features a new episode of our podcast Techsmarts | Art + Technology. Listen, Rate and Subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud.

TechsmARTs Podcast : Episode 4 | The Modern Day Actor with Victoria Temple. 

Victoria Temple is a Film and TV Agent for the Atlanta based talent agency People Store.

Featuring: Victoria Temple, Film and TV Agent for People Store, an Atlanta talent agency

For this month’s TechsmARTs podcast, Film and TV Agent Victoria Temple gives tips for the Modern Day Actor. How has casting changed with the advent of casting through self taping? How should actors present themselves when submitting to auditions and agents? What can help Atlanta actors to be competitive with actors from other markets?

Click Here to Subscribe to TechsmARTs

Check out more about People Store online:

People Store

Facebook | InstagramLinkedIn | Twitter Website

People Store provides a great list of resources for Atlanta based talent. Check out their list here.

 

Fall 2017 Hatch Training Intensive Artists Announced

Art by Bethany Pelle - The Good Feelings. Site specific installation of over 1,500 slip cast porcelain flowers created as part of the East Row Garden Walk in Newport, KY. Photo by Bethany Pelle.
Art by Bethany Pelle – The Good Feelings. Site specific installation of over 1,500 slip cast porcelain flowers created as part of the East Row Garden Walk in Newport, KY. Photo by Bethany Pelle.

C4 Atlanta is proud to announce the twelve artists selected into the Hatch Training Intensive for Fall 2017. This will be the fourth cohort of artists that have participated in the Hatch Program since it was started in 2015. Over the next four months these artists will learn skills for creating art projects with community, with a final culminating public presentation on December 16, 2017.

The Hatch Training Intensive was established as a training program through C4 Atlanta in October 2015 with the generous support of the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The course is a result of three years of collaboration, research and curriculum development with both national and local experts in the field of community driven art projects. The purpose of the program is to address the skills needs of artists working in a variety of community contexts. The artists work independently and in groups to build skills for a variety of different community work. While many of the artists who participate are already active in community projects, others seek out the program in order to gain the skills and vocabulary necessary for more specialized work such as urban development or planning projects.

Art by Tiffany LaTrice - In Memory of Mary Turner. In Memory of Mary Turner is a tribute to the life of Mary Turner and other women subjected to mob violence and<br />
Art by Tiffany LaTrice – In Memory of Mary Turner. In Memory of Mary Turner is a tribute to the life of Mary Turner and other women subjected to mob violence and lynching during Jim Crow South. Photo by Sarah Gormley.

A major program focus is building “soft” skills in cultural organizing, understanding and establishing identity, identifying key community stakeholders, and working with community in ways that are sustainable for both artists and community members. In addition, one thing that makes the Hatch Training Intensive unique from other community art programs is that it also emphasizes important career development skills necessary to do social and civic practice work, including working with city planners, applying for RFPs/RFQs, negotiation and budgeting.

“Through this training program, we hope to provide greater access to resources for artists doing community work,” said Executive Director Jessyca Holland. “We’re incredibly proud of the work our past Hatch artists are doing around Atlanta, regionally, and even internationally. ”

Star Taker. Lead Artist - Alison Hamil, with a team of 4 other student artist. Located in Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, the mural references celestial navigation in Ancient Greece.
Star Taker. Lead Artist – Alison Hamil, with a team of 4 other student artists. Located in Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, the mural references celestial navigation in Ancient Greece.

“We want to make sure that not only do the artists benefit from the training, but that they also benefit from working with each other so closely, ” said Education Manager Audrey Gámez. “There is a lot of hands-on group work in this program, which helps with developing skills for collaboration and broadens the participants’ artistic networks.”

Selection of artists for this cohort was made by an independent committee of public art professionals who work directly with artists. The committee included Katherine Dirga of MARTA Artbound, Brandon Jones of WonderRoot, and Josh Phillipson of the Atlanta Regional Commission.

Artists selected to the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive include:

Artist Angela Bortone. Photo by Haylee Anne
Photo by Haylee Anne

Angela Bortone – Painter, Video Artist, Arts Critic

Angela Bortone is a painter, video artist and freelance art critic. She mixes other people’s voices into her paintings and videos. Born in the Dominican Republic, Bortone was raised in Brooklyn and spent nearly a decade abroad in Germany before moving to Atlanta in 2002. She earned a BFA in studio art with a concentration in drawing, painting and printmaking from Georgia State University in 2010.

 

Artist Sally EppsteinSally Eppstein – Sculptor, Visual Artist

Sally was raised in Augusta, Georgia but her first real education was moving to New York City and going to school at the Fashion Institute of Technology.  Living in the city and being exposed to so much diversity with all the different nationalities and so many art museums was a huge part of her education. She majored in jewelry where she did both design and studio work.  After Sally completed the associate program, she moved back to her hometown to complete her B.F.A. at Augusta College (now Augusta State University).

After receiving her B.F.A, Sally taught art for 10 years to kindergartners through high school students in both public and private schools. While teaching she continued her art practice by selling jewelry and paintings throughout the southeast.

The biggest influence in Sally’s art has always been nature. Her latest series of paintings has focused on different feathers of song birds, birds of prey, and waterfowl. As part of her Artist-in-residence at the Blue Heron Nature Preserve she made an eight foot tall stainless steel feather sculpture. Sally sees feathers as being so fragile just as she sees our environment which has inspired her to be come a big tree activist.

Sally was inspired to start to do sculpture when she saw the Art on the Beltline and it is amazing how many skills that she had learned from her jewelry training have translated for her large totems.

Other achievements are getting into Vermont Studio Center, being awarded the first Artist-in-residence at the Blue Heron Nature Preserve, being awarded an Emerging Artist Award for the Gasparilla Festival in Tampa, FL and being a part of Art Leaders of Metro Atlanta with Atlanta Regional Commission 2016.

Artist Bria Goeller

Bria Goeller – Visual Artist, Sound Artist, Designer, Writer

Bria Goeller is passionate about art and social change. Bria works in a multitude of mediums including photography, film, 2D visual art, sound art, graphic design, creative writing and illustration/comics. Already a leader in her own right, Bria has been the Director of Design & Technology for TEDxEmory,  Executive VP of Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society, Executive Board Member for the Homeless Outreach Awareness Project, Founding Member and Design Chair of MR.MA’AM: Emory’s Queer Literary and Art Journal, and Genre and Visual Arts Editor for The Pulse Anthology. Bria is currently a student at Emory University studying English/Creative Writing and Interdisciplinary Studies.

Culinary Artist and Stylist S. Promised Gourdet.S. Promised Gourdet – Culinary Arts, Photographer, Stylist

Promised Land Kitchen explores the intersection of food, imagination, taste and community. Promised has partnered with community gardens, local food purveyors and food justice advocates in the fight for food sovereignty in under-served communities in metro Atlanta. She strives to address the urgency in addressing malnutrition and food insecurity in our communities, and the link between dietary habits and overall health and wellness.

Theatre Artist Rachel Graf Evans. Photo by Hoberman Studios.
Photo by Hoberman Studios.

Rachel Graf Evans – Theatre Artist, Composer

Rachel Graf Evans is a writer and theatre artist most interested in the telling of forgotten and silenced stories.

Rachel Graf Evans grew up in in Baltimore, Jerusalem, and Jakarta, before attending Quaker boarding school in Westtown, PA. After one year in the musical theatre performance training program at NYU – CAP21, she transferred to Oberlin College. She graduated from Oberlin with High Honors BA in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, as well as a BA in theatre, for the writing and composition of Vessel: A New Musical. RGE currently serves as the Dramatists Guild Regional Young Ambassador for Atlanta, is a member of Working Title Playwrights, and recently completed a Playwright Apprenticeship at Horizon Theatre Company. Her work can be read on the New Play Exchange.

Prior to Atlanta, RGE spent four years in NYC working in various capacities (including as playwright, producer, props designer, and/or performer) with New Georges, LCT3 at Lincoln Center, PowerOutNYC, Hot Pepper Theatre, York Theatre Company, Fresh Fruit Festival and Theatre for the New City’s Dream Up Festival.

She is an Associate Member of the NYC women’s barbershop chorus Sirens of Gotham.

AArtist Alison Hamil.lison Hamil – Visual Artist, Graphic Designer

Alison Hamil’s creative spark began at an early age. As a child, she was constantly building, sculpting, making, and creating. She fondly remembers doing imaginative things like constructing a robot entirely out of recycled materials on a whim, and holding an art show at a pop-up gallery in her parents’ garage. Throughout her childhood, she won several art contests, and decided to be a cartoonist in fourth grade. That didn’t quite pan out, but she wasn’t far off.

In high school, Alison realized that she was the only student not using ceramics class as an excuse to slack off, so she decided to pursue formal training and a career in art. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Georgia State University with a concentration in Drawing and Painting in 2010. She also studied the art of graphic design while she was in school, and now specializes in using what she’s learned to bridge the gap between technology and traditional drawing and painting.

Currently, Alison is a working artist in her hometown of Atlanta, Georgia. She has a diverse body of work including murals, sign painting, graphic design, paintings on paper, and drawings. Most of her work incorporates bold colors, patterns, symmetry, and bright colors.

Alison has been awarded several scholarships, and was named Best Emerging Visual Artist in Creative Loafing’s Best of Atlanta 2013. Although she is based in Atlanta, Georgia, she has painted murals in various places across the globe including Nicoya, Costa Rica, and Kefalonia, Greece, and several various towns throughout North Carolina. She has exhibited in Kibbee Gallery, Mason Murer Gallery, The Granite Room, MOCA GA, MINT Gallery and Gallery 1526, and she has been included in several art showcases in Atlanta, including the 2013-15 and 2017 Hambidge Art Auction and Performance Gala.

Plant Artist Erin Hayes.Erin Hayes – Plant Artist

After returning to Atlanta from teaching in international schools in the United Arab Emirates and Brazil, Erin Hayes found herself back in her hometown of College Park, Georgia eager to get involved in the revitalization efforts taking place around Atlanta. As a third generation educator, Erin has long realized the role that education plays in one’s life. Hailing from a long line of gardeners, Erin brings her varied interests in city development, education and horticulture as well as her experiences from living abroad to the forefront of her work. After the passing of a dear friend in March of 2017, Erin began to seek ways to honor his legacy by bringing city-dwellers closer to their natural world. She conceived the idea of combining enterprise, urban farming and horticulture along with education to address the accessibility gaps that largely affect young men and women in her community.

CArtist Christopher Jones.hristopher Jones – Graphic Designer, Visual Artist

Christopher Jones is the founder of SeeJones Creative, LLC, a creative services firm that helps mission-driven organizations and visionary leaders expand their reach through impactful visual communications. Notable projects include: a community mural in the Castleberry Hill neighborhood; helping a local co-working space to build a sense of community within its space through incorporating hand-drawn chalk murals on its walls; developing brand identity and marketing collateral for several non- and for-profit entities.

Christopher earned a BFA in graphic design from The University of Tennessee and an MBA in Marketing from Lincoln Memorial University. His career path has revolved around serving in leadership roles and providing corporate communications for non-profits. Chris feels that because of his background in service to his community, he understands the challenges that the organizations that he works with have faced.

Artist Krista Jones.

Krista Jones (“Jonesy”) – Graphic Designer, Illustrator, Muralist

Jonesy is an Atlanta based Graphic Designer, Illustrator and Muralist. She has over a decade of professional graphic design experience and provides services in print advertising and design, logos, branding, illustration, hand-painted signage, residential and commercial murals. Her public art can be seen in Decatur and Avondale Estates and her illustrations in local shops around Atlanta. She is a published designer, writer and illustrator. Jonesy’s artwork has been featured multiple times on the cover of Aquarius Magazine. Some of her clients include: Atlanta BeltLine, Unscripted Way, Sustainable Wellness, Aquarius Magazine, Brandshake Creative, Precision Performance Atlanta, Expression Chiropractic, Virtually Staging Properties, Lake Claire Community Land Trust and City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

Artist, Curator and Arts Administrator Tiffany LaTrice.Tiffany LaTrice – Visual Artist, Curator, Arts Administrator

Tiffany Latrice is an Atlanta based visual artist, curator and arts administrato. In her work, she seeks to understand the psychology of human emotion through the female body. The female body is used as a means to unveil the variety of emotions, especially the emotions that are hidden deep within a woman. She has always been passionate about women’s stories and how she depicts those stories on canvas. With a degree in international relations with a concentration in gender, culture, and global society from the University of Southern California and a masters in women’s history from Sarah Lawrence College, her art is a feminist statement that seeks to combat androcentric world views of women’s role in society. Through her compositions and texture, she tells the story of marginalized voices and systematic oppression. By the use of bold colors and vivid brush strokes, she moves women from marginalized spaces to spaces of power and agency. She combats objectification and commodification by allowing the viewer to undergo a journey through the elaborate imagery that she depicts on the canvas.

Tiffany is the Founder and Executive Director of TILA Studios, a visual arts incubator, co-working and shared gallery space serving female visuals artists in Metro Atlanta area. Located in East Point, GA, TILA Studios strives to be a place where women can work, collaborate, and exhibit to create a more inclusive art industry where women’s voices are heard and recognized.

Actor and Artist L S LewisL S Lewis – Sculptor, Fabricator, Writer, Actor, Comedian

Working in mixed media to accurately express the emotional language that underlies current events, L S Lewis’ work captures human processes in various struggles in a relatable and often humorous manner. L S has participated in several group gallery shows and has independently undertaken public installations. She resides in Atlanta, GA.

 

Ceramic Artist and Educator Bethany Pelle.Bethany Pelle – Ceramicist, Arts Educator

Bethany Pelle is an artist, craftsperson, and educator with over four years teaching experience at the university level. Bethany has twelve years of technical experience in support of academic, commercial and private ceramics studios. She is an ardent supporter of greater inclusivity, equality, and social justice. Bethany is currently an Adjunct Professor at Northern Kentucky University. Bethany brings a breadth of perspective and connections to the diverse art communities in Miami, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and New York.

The selected artists will present their final public presentation on December 16, 2017 from 2-4pm at Fuse Arts Center. Hatch artists will present group projects that represent hypothetical community scenarios which they may encounter as part of their work. Though the prompts are hypothetical, all are based on actual RFPs or Calls for Artists. These projects allow the artist to exercise skills learned in Hatch without fear of harm to themselves or an actual community during the learning process. More information and RSVP for the final presentations will be available online at c4atlanta.org/training at a later date.

For more information about the Hatch Training Intensive, please visit c4atlanta.org/hatch.

TechsmARTs Podcast | Episode 3 : Engaging Your Following

The last Friday of every month, C4 Atlanta features a new episode of our podcast Techsmarts | Art + Technology. Listen, Rate and Subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud.

TechsmARTs Podcast : Episode 3 | Engaging Your Following, with Brock Scott of Little Tybee

Singer Brock Scott performs with his band Little Tybee at C4 Atlanta's recent #ActivateATL concert.
Brock Scott performs with his band Little Tybee at C4 Atlanta’s recent #ActivateATL concert. Photo by Haylee Anne Kitties.

Featuring: Brock Scott, sculptor, visual artist and musician. 

Brock Scott of Little Tybee stops by C4 Atlanta to talk about social media and artistic creation to engage your following. Scott explains how he and his bandmates transcend the traditional cycle of audience engagement for musicians and create a unique artistic experience for their fans. What do 6 radios, over a hundred fans and locations across the world have to do with creating one of their most successful music videos?

Click Here to Subscribe to TechsmARTs

Check out more of Brock’s work online:

Check out the video for “Quiet As a Sail”, which utilized videos from all over the world of footage containing the transistor radios altered by Brock Scott.

On the Grid Creative

Facebook (On The Grid Creative) | Website

Little Tybee

Facebook (Little Tybee) | Twitter (@littletybee) | Instagram (@littletybee) | YouTube (Little Tybee) | Website

Brock Scott 

Instagram (@brockscott) | Solo Album Info

 

Cake Dishes Her Favorite ATL Artist

Atlanta is full of amazing artists creating work all over our city. In order to highlight all the artistic assets in our community, we reached looked to local artist for their recommendations. Presenting My ATL heART Crush, a limited weekly series documenting artists in Atlanta and the artists that they love. We will release one each Friday on our blog and Instagram for the next four weeks. Series shot by Jeremiah Davison.

Meet visual artist and tattoo artist Cake, co-owner of Black Owl Tattoo and Art Gallery.

An alumnus of City of Ink, Cake is now co-owner of her own tattoo shop and art gallery in East Atlanta Village with partner Roger Parrilla called Black Owl Tattoo and Art Gallery. Know for her custom color works for all skin tones, you can find Cake’s work on Atlantans all around the city. In addition, Cake creates murals, illustrations and visual artwork that have been featured throughout Atlanta.  To find out more about her work, visit lovelivecake.com. Follow her work on Instagram at @lovelivecake.

 

Find out more about Cakes’s favorite Atlanta artist:

C. Flux Sing – Graphic Designer, Painter

cfluxsing.com/

Twitter: @cfluxsing

Facebook: C. Flux Sing

Instagram: @cfluxsing

C. Flux Sing Blog

 

 

Anthony Gary Shares the Atlanta Artists That Inspire Him

Atlanta is full of amazing artists creating work all over our city. In order to highlight all the artistic assets in our community, we reached looked to local artist for their recommendations. Presenting My ATL heART Crush, a limited weekly series documenting artists in Atlanta and the artists that they love. We will release one each Friday on our blog and Instagram for the next four weeks. Series shot by Jeremiah Davidson.

 

Meet photographer Anthony Gary.

 

Anthony’s work documents the homeless and often overlooked population in our city. To find out more about his work, visit truththecreative.com. You can also see his work on Instagram at @truththecreative.

 

Find out more about Anthony’s favorite Atlanta artists:

Artemis Jenkins – Visual Artist

artemusjenkins.com

Instagram: @artemusjenkins

Kaya Faery – Photographer

Instagram: @kayashoots

Facebook: Kaya Faery Photography

Tumblr: kayafaeryphotography

Phyllis Iller – Multidisciplinary Artist

phyllisiller.com

Instagram: @phyllis.iller

Facebook: Phyllis Iller

Tumblr: phyllis.iller