Category: Atlanta

Fulton County Awards C4 Atlanta $12,000 for 2018 Programming.

C4 Atlanta was recently awarded $12,000 by the Fulton County Commissioners through Fulton County Arts and Culture’s Contracts for Services granting program.

This award will help C4 Atlanta to continue to offer programs and services to over 1,200 professional artists in the Greater Atlanta area in 2018. C4 Atlanta continues to be recognized for the strength of our educational programs for artists. Grant awards like this one help to subsidize the cost of offering our ongoing programs, such as our Ignite Business Planning for Artists, in order to keep them affordable for artists. In addition, it allows us to continue offering programming that keeps artists up to date on the latest trends in arts business. C4 utilizes grant funds to host new programs that may hold a timely interest to artists or to revise existing programs with new updates to keep up with current trends in arts business.

C4 Atlanta is proud to be a recipient of this funding. Thank You, Fulton County!

 

The Candidates + ATL Artists

I'm a Georgia Voter StickerWe need your help in getting the word out about the importance of art and artists in our city’s future. Here’s how you can help:

  1. Encourage Candidates to Answer the Questionnaire About the Arts. C4 Atlanta has released a short questionnaire to all candidates running for Atlanta City Council, City Council President and Mayor for which we could find contact information. C4 intends to publish any and all answers provided by candidates or their campaigns on our blog. Here are the questions that we’ve asked the candidates:
  • Who do you consider Atlanta’s Cultural leaders?
  • Considering such models as L.A. and Detroit (to name a few) that incorporate artists into planning and city government, what presence do you see for local artists in city government work beyond Contracts for Arts Services through OCA, Elevate, and city commissions?
  • For City Council Candidates: How do you plan to work with fellow council members and the Mayor’s Office to protect the ways artists work in this city? (Some initiatives on our radar: removing barriers to small business development for artists and entrepreneurs; protection of free speech; freelancer benefits similar to NYC)?
  • For Mayoral Candidates: How do you plan to work with city council to protect the ways artists work in this city? (Some initiatives on our radar: removing barriers to small business development for artists and entrepreneurs; protection of free speech; freelancer benefits similar to NYC)?
  • How do you plan to include individual artists/freelancers in policies and programs to provide affordable housing and workspace?

Help us get the word out to your candidates! You can help us encourage the candidates that you care about to answer by tagging them in our social media posts. Let them know that you care about these issues and the future of artists in Atlanta. Tag our posts on C4 Atlanta’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

Our Executive Director Jessyca Holland recently wrote a great blog post about the importance of artists votes in the upcoming election. You can read it here.

2) Attend Fireside Chat: Election Edition – and bring a friend! Join us for our upcoming Fireside Chat: Election Edition on November 2 at 6:00pm. Fun and joy promised, and information assured! C4 believes that the voting process can be BOTH fun and informational. We’ll be convening artists to discuss the questions and answers provided by candidates to our questionnaire, along with what you believe to be the biggest issues in the upcoming elections for artists. In addition, we promise snacks, button making, a little last minute info about where and how to vote, and maybe even an extra surprise or two thrown in just for grins. Artists Jessica Caldas and Haylee Anne will be joining to talk about their exhibition and project Goldsmack at Eyedrum related to this election. This is a chance for our community to convene one last time before we head to the polls to decide the future of Atlanta Arts and Culture workers. RSVP for the event here. You can share this event with your friends on Facebook here.

 

Fireside Chat: Election Edition

Date/Time: November 2, 2017 – 6:00pm-9:00pm RSVP Now

Location: Fuse Arts Center, inside the M. Rich Center for Creative Arts, Media and Technology, 115 Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr SW, Atlanta, GA 30303 Click Here for Directions to Fuse

Cost: Free, but you must RSVP. RSVP Online Here

For questions or more information, please contact actionteam@c4atlanta.org.

C4 Atlanta is a 501(c)3 nonprofit and does not endorse or recommend any candidate for any position. The purpose of these events is to share information within the arts community so that artists in Atlanta can make informed choices at the polls based on their personal values and beliefs.

C4 Atlanta is proud recipient of a grant through Our Future Atlanta to fund this project. The purpose of our grant proposal is to encourage discussion and voting by Atlanta artists about the November local elections. Our grant aligns with Our Future Atlanta’s focus area on Arts and Cultural Diversity. To learn more about Our Future Atlanta, visit: ourfutureatlanta.org 

 

TechsmARTs Podcast | Episode 3 : Engaging Your Following

The last Friday of every month, C4 Atlanta features a new episode of our podcast Techsmarts | Art + Technology. Listen, Rate and Subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud.

TechsmARTs Podcast : Episode 3 | Engaging Your Following, with Brock Scott of Little Tybee

Singer Brock Scott performs with his band Little Tybee at C4 Atlanta's recent #ActivateATL concert.
Brock Scott performs with his band Little Tybee at C4 Atlanta’s recent #ActivateATL concert. Photo by Haylee Anne Kitties.

Featuring: Brock Scott, sculptor, visual artist and musician. 

Brock Scott of Little Tybee stops by C4 Atlanta to talk about social media and artistic creation to engage your following. Scott explains how he and his bandmates transcend the traditional cycle of audience engagement for musicians and create a unique artistic experience for their fans. What do 6 radios, over a hundred fans and locations across the world have to do with creating one of their most successful music videos?

Click Here to Subscribe to TechsmARTs

Check out more of Brock’s work online:

Check out the video for “Quiet As a Sail”, which utilized videos from all over the world of footage containing the transistor radios altered by Brock Scott.

On the Grid Creative

Facebook (On The Grid Creative) | Website

Little Tybee

Facebook (Little Tybee) | Twitter (@littletybee) | Instagram (@littletybee) | YouTube (Little Tybee) | Website

Brock Scott 

Instagram (@brockscott) | Solo Album Info

 

Cake Dishes Her Favorite ATL Artist

Atlanta is full of amazing artists creating work all over our city. In order to highlight all the artistic assets in our community, we reached looked to local artist for their recommendations. Presenting My ATL heART Crush, a limited weekly series documenting artists in Atlanta and the artists that they love. We will release one each Friday on our blog and Instagram for the next four weeks. Series shot by Jeremiah Davison.

Meet visual artist and tattoo artist Cake, co-owner of Black Owl Tattoo and Art Gallery.

An alumnus of City of Ink, Cake is now co-owner of her own tattoo shop and art gallery in East Atlanta Village with partner Roger Parrilla called Black Owl Tattoo and Art Gallery. Know for her custom color works for all skin tones, you can find Cake’s work on Atlantans all around the city. In addition, Cake creates murals, illustrations and visual artwork that have been featured throughout Atlanta.  To find out more about her work, visit lovelivecake.com. Follow her work on Instagram at @lovelivecake.

 

Find out more about Cakes’s favorite Atlanta artist:

C. Flux Sing – Graphic Designer, Painter

cfluxsing.com/

Twitter: @cfluxsing

Facebook: C. Flux Sing

Instagram: @cfluxsing

C. Flux Sing Blog

 

 

Anthony Gary Shares the Atlanta Artists That Inspire Him

Atlanta is full of amazing artists creating work all over our city. In order to highlight all the artistic assets in our community, we reached looked to local artist for their recommendations. Presenting My ATL heART Crush, a limited weekly series documenting artists in Atlanta and the artists that they love. We will release one each Friday on our blog and Instagram for the next four weeks. Series shot by Jeremiah Davidson.

 

Meet photographer Anthony Gary.

 

Anthony’s work documents the homeless and often overlooked population in our city. To find out more about his work, visit truththecreative.com. You can also see his work on Instagram at @truththecreative.

 

Find out more about Anthony’s favorite Atlanta artists:

Artemis Jenkins – Visual Artist

artemusjenkins.com

Instagram: @artemusjenkins

Kaya Faery – Photographer

Instagram: @kayashoots

Facebook: Kaya Faery Photography

Tumblr: kayafaeryphotography

Phyllis Iller – Multidisciplinary Artist

phyllisiller.com

Instagram: @phyllis.iller

Facebook: Phyllis Iller

Tumblr: phyllis.iller

 

 

 

 

 

Artists join to #ActivateATL

C4 Atlanta is excited to announce musical acts and speakers for its #ActivateATL concert on August 5, 2017 at the Masquerade. Musical guests include co-headliners Chantae Cann and Little Tybee. Nse Ufot of the New Georgia Project and Rep. David Dreyer will be featured speakers for the evening. This event is free, all ages and open to the public.

Nse Ufot, Executive Director of the New Georgia Project, is one of two featured speakers for #ActivateATL.
Nse Ufot, Executive Director of the New Georgia Project, is one of two featured speakers for #ActivateATL.

#ActivateATL is a concert celebration of the power to change communities through voting in the upcoming November Atlanta Mayoral and City Council Elections. In particular, this free, non-partisan concert hopes to uplift the voices of voters and showcase the unique contributions of arts workers in their communities. Information about voting in upcoming elections and job duties for open seats will be distributed to attendees. A pledge to vote or support their current community is all that is needed for entry. The event is sponsored by the Masquerade, Atlanta Downtown Improvement District, The Iron Yard, ArtsATL, Binders Art Supplies and Frames, and visual artist Stephanie Lloyd. Community Partners include Signs of Solidarity, Center for Civic Innovation, Georgia Artists for Progress and the United Arts Front.

Featured Speaker David Dreyer is the State Representative for District 59.

Through this concert, C4 Atlanta hopes to encourage voters to exercise their power to influence the future of the city in whatever way aligns with their personal values. In particular, C4 also wishes to recognize the efforts of the creative class to effect change in community through their voting power, organizing and artistic work.

Nse Ufot is Executive Director of the New Georgia Project and a passionate advocate for voter rights. A naturalized citizen originally born in Nigeria, Ms. Ufot grew up in Southwest Atlanta. She has witnessed the changes and fluctuations of the city and it population since her childhood. A lifelong advocate of civil, human and workers’ rights, she leads the New Georgia Project in its mission to engage and register Georgia’s eligible but unregistered African American, Latinx, and Asian American populations.

David Dreyer was elected State Representative for House District 59 in 2016. A graduate of Georgia State and Emory Universities, David is a long-time Atlanta resident. As a policymaker, David has been a vocal supporter of voter rights and voter protections.

Psychadelic folk favorites Little Tybee will join us for #ActivateATL after their recent U.S. tour.

Local favorites Little Tybee join #ActivateATL after their recent, successful U.S. tour. Known for their melodious, genre bending sounds, their music reflects the stellar musicianship of this eclectic six-piece ensemble.  Their fourth, self-titled album was released in 2016 and they have shared stages around the world with artists such as Macy Gray, Of Montreal, Kurt Vile, Reptar, Sondre Lerche, Man Man, Kishi Bashi, and others.

Musical guest singer-songwriter Chantae Cann is known for blending the exploratory sounds of Jazz with the feel good vibes of Soul.
Musical guest singer-songwriter Chantae Cann is known for blending the exploratory sounds of Jazz with the feel good vibes of Soul.

Joining Little Tybee as co-headliner is singer-songwriter Chantae Cann. Blending the musical boundaries between jazz and soul, Cann released her solo debut album “Journey to Golden” in March 2016 after a 10+ year career as a backing vocalist and collaborator for artists such as India.Arie, Snarky Puppy, P.J. Morgan, Gramps Morton, and many others. Her highly anticipated sophomore album is due out in Fall of 2017. Both acts have a history of past support of social causes.

Doors open at 7pm on August 5, 2017, and the show starts at 8pm. Tickets are free, with an online pledge to vote or support your community. For more concert information and tickets, visit: c4atlanta.org/activate-atl

#ActivateATL
August 5, 2017
Doors at 7:00pm; Show Starts at 8:00pm
Masquerade (Hell), 50 Lower Alabama St. SE, Atlanta, GA 30308
Featuring Little Tybee and Chantae Cann.
Tickets: c4atlanta.org/activate-atl/tickets
All Ages
Free

About C4 Atlanta:

C4 Atlanta Inc. is a non-profit arts service organization whose mission is to connect arts entrepreneurs to the people, skills and tools they need to build a successful artistic career in metro Atlanta. The organization was founded in July 2010 in response to a growing need for business services for Atlanta’s arts community. C4 Atlanta fulfills this mission by offering professional practice classes for artists, fiscal sponsorship, co-working space, and more. C4 Atlanta’s program offerings are geared toward creating a new foundation of sustainability for arts and culture in the Atlanta region. For more information, visit c4atlanta.org.

About Nse Ufot:

Nse Ufot has dedicated her life and career working on various civil, human, and workers’ rights issues. As the Executive Director of the New Georgia Project, she is proud to lead the organization to its goal of strengthening the state’s democracy by registering and engaging Georgia’s eligible, but unregistered African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans.

Prior to joining the New Georgia Project, Ms. Ufot worked as the Assistant Executive Director for the Canadian Association of University Teachers, Canada’s largest faculty union. She also served as the Senior Lobbyist and Government Relations Officer for the American Association of University Professors. In this role, she coordinated initiatives for mobilizing members around legislation and regulations that impacted higher education and labor law.

Ms. Ufot, a proud naturalized citizen, was born in Nigeria and raised in Southwest Atlanta. She earned a Bachelor of Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Dayton School of Law. Ms. Ufot is fluent in both French and English. In her free time, she enjoys international travel, listening and playing music from the African Diaspora, and hosting house parties for close friends and family. For more information about Nse Ufot or New Georgia Project, please visit newgeorgiaproject.org.

About David Dreyer:

David was elected as State Representative for House District 59 in 2016. David was born in Ringgold, Georgia, but David’s family moved to Roswell where David started middle school. David graduated from Georgia State where he was involved in various student groups, including founding the Young Democrats and working with an environmental and homeless advocacy group. David received the student leadership award from his graduating class. After attending Georgia State, David graduated from Emory Law, where he remained committed to public service, serving as student body president and working on several campaigns. 

One focus of David’s studies was constitutional law and voter protection, areas that remain in the forefront of his career. David was admitted to the State Bar in 2004, and David is an attorney with Penn Law Group, representing individuals and companies in courts throughout Georgia. David married Melissa in 2006, and they have two boys, Henry and Leo. David and his family place a strong value on community service and enjoy volunteering and helping neighbors. 

David serves on the Higher Education, Science and Technology and Civil Judiciary Committees. for more information about David Dreyer, visit dreyerforgeorgia.com

About Little Tybee:

Little Tybee is a 6 piece band based in Atlanta, GA whose music has been described as genre bending and refreshing to both veteran and exploring ears. The core of each of their songs begins in the relentless and creative mind of vocalist/guitarist/pianist Brock Scott. The songs mature through the dedicated musicianship of 8-string guitarist Josh Martin, violinist Nirvana Kelly, bassist Ryan Donald, keyboardist Chris Case and percussionist Dallas Dawson. Little Tybee isn’t afraid to experiment freely, even dangerously at times, to follow a musical idea to its ultimate end. This mentality has led the group to explore music that transcends genre and packs a much bigger punch than their modest title implies. Over the past few years they have had the pleasure of sharing the stage with Of Montreal, Kurt Vile, Here We Go Magic, Rising Appalachia, Macy Gray, Reptar, Sondre Lerche, Nicole Atkins, Man Man, Kishi Bashi, and a number of others. For more information about Little Tybee, visit littletybee.com

About Chantae Cann:

Chantae Cann is next premier vocalist on the rise with her debut album “Journey to Golden” that released March 2016 at #1 on the iTunes Jazz Charts and #7 on the Jazz Billboard Charts.

Her vocal delivery is soothing, sultry and more than just soulful, it’s soul fulfilling. Whether you find yourself listening to her live at a show or turning her up in your headphones, chances are you will have peace in your mind and a smile on your face. Chantae’s music blends the exploratory sounds of Jazz with the feel good vibes of Soul, which makes for a mixture that is quite delicious. It is her heart’s desire to simply inspire, uplift and encourage the lives of others through music.

Chantae is not a novice to the music world. She has been blessed to travel the world as a background vocalist (10+ years) with P.J. Morton, Gramps Morgan, and most notably India Arie. She’s had the tremendous honor of collaborating with artists/bands such as, Snarky Puppy, Jarrod Lawson, Jonathan McReynolds, Tony Momrelle, Jaspects, The Foreign Exchange, Zo!, Mike Hicks, Sho Baraka and Khari Cabral Simmons.

Chantae’s second album is set to release fall of 2017. For more information about Chantae Cann, visit: chantaecann.com

Hatch Selection Committee Announced

Our Fall Hatch cohort deepens their knowledge of what is needed in a public art contract in order to protect their interests.
Our Fall Hatch cohort deepens their knowledge of what is needed in a public art contract in order to protect their interests.

We are eagerly awaiting selection of our next Hatch cohort for Spring 2017!

Applications are open and ongoing. The deadline for application is January 9, 2017 at 11:59pm.

We are proud to announce our Selection Committee for the 2017 Spring Hatch Training Intensive. We know their guidance will help in selecting a cohort of diverse and passionate artists ready to work in community. Our Selection Committee is:

Alex Acosta – Executive Director of Soul Food Cypher

Lauren Pallotta Stumberg – Organizer of Moreland Mural Project and Visual Artist

Rachel Parish – Program Director of Little Five Arts Alive , Performing Artist and Artistic Director of Firehouse Creative Productions

Saskia Benjamin – Executive Director of Art Papers

 

Applications for Hatch and more information about the program is available here: Hatch Application Page. For questions about this program, please email Audrey Gámez, Education Manager at audrey@c4atlanta.org. Please note: All questions received after 7pm on January 6, 2017 will be answered on January 9, 2017.

Ebony Noelle Golden talks about Conscious Creativity

Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty's Daughter Arts Collaborative, speaks about Conscious Creativity.
Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative, speaks about Conscious Creativity.

What does it mean to use creativity in an intentional way for community building and social change? Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative recently visited Atlanta to share thoughts and ideas for using a conscious creative practice to build engage community in a collaborative, constructive way.

In partnership with the Center for Civic Innovation‘s South Downtown Initiative and the M. Rich Center for Creative Arts, Media and Technology, C4 Atlanta presented Ebony Noelle Golden’s keynote talk on March 11, 2016. Aimed at getting those interested talking about using the arts across disciplines, this talk brought together city organizers and planners, studio artists, organizational leaders, business owners, property developers, and many more to explore the topic of conscious creativity.

Below are some photos from her talk. The transcript of her speech is available to download as a PDF here: Speech Transcript.

Ebony invites all in our community to sing and dance and share their communal creative spirit.
Ebony invites all in our community to sing and dance and share their communal creative spirit.
Attendees were asked to turn to their neighbor, introduce themselves and talk about why they were here.
Attendees were asked to turn to their neighbor, introduce themselves and talk about why they were here.
Ebony asks audience members to share their conversations about who they met. Many community members spoke with leaders in other sectors whom they might not have met otherwise.
Ebony asks audience members to share their conversations about who they met. Many people spoke to a neighbor who was involved in a different community building sector than themselves.
Ebony talks about the need for community building to start as a regular practice within the community. Issues cannot be solved by "outsiders" who "have the right answers".
Ebony talks about the need for true community building and conversation to start as a regular practice within organizations and groups. Issues cannot be solved by “outsiders” who “have the right answers”. She urged us instead to take her experiences and include the knowledge as a part of an ongoing practice of love for the community.
A community leader from Alternate Roots discusses concerns and questions regarding community building with a member of the Urban Land Institute.
A community leader from Alternate Roots discusses concerns and questions regarding community building with a member of the Urban Land Institute.

 

 

TechsmARTs: Interactive Media and Tech Savvy Audiences

Mark Gindick DramaTech Box OfLast week C4 Atlanta and the Office of Arts at Georgia Tech had the pleasure of sitting down with Mark Gindick to talk about his use of technology and social media in his one man show, Wingman, for our January TechsmARTs. During our discussion Mark spoke quite a lot about what it takes to integrate technology of this kind into live performance, and where the inspiration for his show came from.

 

 

 

If you missed our discussion you can listen full recording here:

 

 

DSCN2232Mark Gindick has been in residence with DramaTech for the last few months working in partnership with the students to find solutions and innovative ways to continue adding technology to Wingman‘s already tech-savvy experience. Their time with Mark was spent developing a new website which would be integrated into the audience’s experience watching Wingman.

The students were unable to join us Monday, January 25th for our TechsmARTs discussion, but they did send over some thoughts about their experience and time working with Mark and this new website.

Here’s what they had to say…

David Howard, DramaTech member & Technical Developer

Being able to track the activity of the website, I was honestly surprised at just how much it was used during the show. Not only was it used, but the audience was able to have fun with it without much prior knowledge beforehand. I think the more tech savvy audience members were able to more easily use it, but that only fueled the entertainment that went to the screen for everyone else. And while not every performance needs this kind of interactive element, this show proves the relatively untapped potential you can have with the interactive environment. On a personal note, it was a fun and slightly surreal experience being able to be in an audience using a product I helped developed. I do a lot of theoretical work and projects in the classrooms here, but I was never able to take our work into the live field until this show.

Christina Herd, DramaTech member & Web Designer

What stands out to me the most about working on this show is honestly the message the show presents to its audiences.  In this age, it seems that the digital version of yourself can be more important than your actual self, and Wingman points out (in the funniest, but heart breaking, way) that this is just not the case.  Knowing that this was the case made designing this site an amazing experience. David, Dennis, and I were designing a website for a show that promotes human interaction over digital interaction. In order to do this, we worked with Mark and Jason VERY closely during the lead up for the demo (early December) to make sure the site did what the show needed it to do. Final touches were completed in early January, and bam the website did (in my opinion) exactly what the show needed. Working with Mark and Jason was such a treat, and I am very honored to have had the small impact on this performance that I did. It is truly an experience I will not forget.  I feel the website makes the show seem Tech Savvy for an audience that may or may not have that quality. It was awesome to watch the young people who use twitter frequently interact with each other on screen, then see the older people being to pick up tweeting.  Being Tech Savvy is important in today’s day and age, and I think the way art is handling that is very interesting. I believe this is truly a transition period for theatre, and soon we will have some art incorporating audience smart phone use as easily as they do lights/sound/set/costume/props/etc.  Art reflects culture, and our culture has shifted to smart phones being the norm and social media being very important, and art will soon follow in that direction.

 

Thanks to everyone who showed up for this incredible conversation.

For more information regarding Mark Gindick and his work check out his website : http://www.wingmantheshow.com/

 

Planning + Art(ists) – Hatch Artists’ Blogs Part 2

Part of the ongoing Hatch blog series, today’s blogs are reflections by our Hatch artists on their experience from the previous weeks’ class by Heather Alhadeff and Allison Bustin from Center Forward. Staff recaps of the session is available on our blog.

For this class, we ask the artists to reflect on the following thoughts:

  • Where is the work that you do most applicable in the planning process? Could it be incorporated in multiple steps?
  • Could you see yourself doing this kind of work? Why or why not? What kinds of projects WOULD you like to work on, regardless of whether they are “planning” related?

We hope you enjoy their thoughtful responses!

In hearing about the history and implementation of City Planning from Center Forward, I enjoyed the breakdown of what constitutes all the steps in the planning process because I could see that in some facet or another I had experienced almost all steps in some form. I think since most of my work has been made through Galleries or other organizations, the vast majority of my experience falls into the Visioning and Implementation categories. In short, I have an idea, describe it, then create it.

Hez Stalcup, far right, with other dancer colleagues at Elevate Atlanta.
Hez Stalcup, far right, with other dancer colleagues at Elevate Atlanta.

While the process of submitting proposals for projects has included some of the other planning stages, I think working within a team seems to be the most efficient and sustainable way to implement all the steps. I would be excited about creating stages of a project that could involve the elements I am less familiar with. I love the idea of a public Museum – cataloging and curating that amazing stories and everyday moments, places, favorite trees, reading spots, etc. on the same level that we would curate precious artifacts. I think the idea of creating mobile town halls, potlucks, art based advertising to spread the word – then using the information to re-visit the original stages of visioning and build RFPs in accordance, would be entirely within a realm that could be adapted to the skills of many artists.

I believe that there are creative ways to make each phase of the step a public art work in and of itself and am very interested in creative solutions to practical problems as another expression in the arts. I think the public forum can often be dismissed as being of less critical value than artworks held within the gallery world. It would be lovely to re-envision the impact that large scale works and public interventions can have, in the valuing of the everyday and elevating it. Whether that be the humans themselves, their history or the nuance of the small places and rituals connecting a neighborhood, community or city.

Some of my favorite examples were public spaces that were simply given attention. The daily activities that were celebrated because staircases, crosswalks, lunch spots and benches were treated as worthy. Can we as artists bring ideas that can be malleable enough to be directed by a group, by other lives and create something that excites and fulfills the people interacting with it? I think it is important and revolutionary work, even when it is very simple.

by Hez Stalcup

Orion
Artist Orion Crook.

As a therapist a big focus of mine is on the process. Even in building a recent therapeutic residency for artists, there is heavily focus on trusting the process and building a safer container for that process to happen within. When we go into community, it is great to have a list of ideas on how to think outside of the box, activate spaces, and engage with people in meaningful ways; but we also need to listen and make room for the unknown. Part of my work as a therapist is to listen for what is not being said, to wonder how I can provide an experience for this individual that is unlike their history, and to check in with myself in order to use my body to collect data about what the other person is experiencing.
For me the scope of these projects are a little large, I tend to be an artist that is fairly comfortable with art being a space for expression in my life. For me this means, I am not focused on making a lot of money or making it my career (although I do identify Therapy as an art form..) and there are some other notions here that are at odds with some of the RFD range that I am still trying to put words to. I have a few art idols in the city and they are less in the public eye (or fight less rigorously to be there) and more personal with their work. It is at times almost like they are happy with where they already are in the art word and make their art because they enjoy it and less so to build a resume. I respect their pacing. Sometimes I do dream big, and would love to install my living sculptures with lots of planning. However, the work is would take to sustain living art is whelming at times. In some ways I don’t see these processes as safer space for artist, but again maybe I just work on a process orientated level and they work on an outcome focused system.

By Orion Crook