Category: Hatch

Fall 2017 Hatch Training Intensive Artists Announced

Art by Bethany Pelle - The Good Feelings. Site specific installation of over 1,500 slip cast porcelain flowers created as part of the East Row Garden Walk in Newport, KY. Photo by Bethany Pelle.
Art by Bethany Pelle – The Good Feelings. Site specific installation of over 1,500 slip cast porcelain flowers created as part of the East Row Garden Walk in Newport, KY. Photo by Bethany Pelle.

C4 Atlanta is proud to announce the twelve artists selected into the Hatch Training Intensive for Fall 2017. This will be the fourth cohort of artists that have participated in the Hatch Program since it was started in 2015. Over the next four months these artists will learn skills for creating art projects with community, with a final culminating public presentation on December 16, 2017.

The Hatch Training Intensive was established as a training program through C4 Atlanta in October 2015 with the generous support of the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The course is a result of three years of collaboration, research and curriculum development with both national and local experts in the field of community driven art projects. The purpose of the program is to address the skills needs of artists working in a variety of community contexts. The artists work independently and in groups to build skills for a variety of different community work. While many of the artists who participate are already active in community projects, others seek out the program in order to gain the skills and vocabulary necessary for more specialized work such as urban development or planning projects.

Art by Tiffany LaTrice - In Memory of Mary Turner. In Memory of Mary Turner is a tribute to the life of Mary Turner and other women subjected to mob violence and<br />
Art by Tiffany LaTrice – In Memory of Mary Turner. In Memory of Mary Turner is a tribute to the life of Mary Turner and other women subjected to mob violence and lynching during Jim Crow South. Photo by Sarah Gormley.

A major program focus is building “soft” skills in cultural organizing, understanding and establishing identity, identifying key community stakeholders, and working with community in ways that are sustainable for both artists and community members. In addition, one thing that makes the Hatch Training Intensive unique from other community art programs is that it also emphasizes important career development skills necessary to do social and civic practice work, including working with city planners, applying for RFPs/RFQs, negotiation and budgeting.

“Through this training program, we hope to provide greater access to resources for artists doing community work,” said Executive Director Jessyca Holland. “We’re incredibly proud of the work our past Hatch artists are doing around Atlanta, regionally, and even internationally. ”

Star Taker. Lead Artist - Alison Hamil, with a team of 4 other student artist. Located in Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, the mural references celestial navigation in Ancient Greece.
Star Taker. Lead Artist – Alison Hamil, with a team of 4 other student artists. Located in Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, the mural references celestial navigation in Ancient Greece.

“We want to make sure that not only do the artists benefit from the training, but that they also benefit from working with each other so closely, ” said Education Manager Audrey Gámez. “There is a lot of hands-on group work in this program, which helps with developing skills for collaboration and broadens the participants’ artistic networks.”

Selection of artists for this cohort was made by an independent committee of public art professionals who work directly with artists. The committee included Katherine Dirga of MARTA Artbound, Brandon Jones of WonderRoot, and Josh Phillipson of the Atlanta Regional Commission.

Artists selected to the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive include:

Artist Angela Bortone. Photo by Haylee Anne
Photo by Haylee Anne

Angela Bortone – Painter, Video Artist, Arts Critic

Angela Bortone is a painter, video artist and freelance art critic. She mixes other people’s voices into her paintings and videos. Born in the Dominican Republic, Bortone was raised in Brooklyn and spent nearly a decade abroad in Germany before moving to Atlanta in 2002. She earned a BFA in studio art with a concentration in drawing, painting and printmaking from Georgia State University in 2010.

 

Artist Sally EppsteinSally Eppstein – Sculptor, Visual Artist

Sally was raised in Augusta, Georgia but her first real education was moving to New York City and going to school at the Fashion Institute of Technology.  Living in the city and being exposed to so much diversity with all the different nationalities and so many art museums was a huge part of her education. She majored in jewelry where she did both design and studio work.  After Sally completed the associate program, she moved back to her hometown to complete her B.F.A. at Augusta College (now Augusta State University).

After receiving her B.F.A, Sally taught art for 10 years to kindergartners through high school students in both public and private schools. While teaching she continued her art practice by selling jewelry and paintings throughout the southeast.

The biggest influence in Sally’s art has always been nature. Her latest series of paintings has focused on different feathers of song birds, birds of prey, and waterfowl. As part of her Artist-in-residence at the Blue Heron Nature Preserve she made an eight foot tall stainless steel feather sculpture. Sally sees feathers as being so fragile just as she sees our environment which has inspired her to be come a big tree activist.

Sally was inspired to start to do sculpture when she saw the Art on the Beltline and it is amazing how many skills that she had learned from her jewelry training have translated for her large totems.

Other achievements are getting into Vermont Studio Center, being awarded the first Artist-in-residence at the Blue Heron Nature Preserve, being awarded an Emerging Artist Award for the Gasparilla Festival in Tampa, FL and being a part of Art Leaders of Metro Atlanta with Atlanta Regional Commission 2016.

Artist Bria Goeller

Bria Goeller – Visual Artist, Sound Artist, Designer, Writer

Bria Goeller is passionate about art and social change. Bria works in a multitude of mediums including photography, film, 2D visual art, sound art, graphic design, creative writing and illustration/comics. Already a leader in her own right, Bria has been the Director of Design & Technology for TEDxEmory,  Executive VP of Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society, Executive Board Member for the Homeless Outreach Awareness Project, Founding Member and Design Chair of MR.MA’AM: Emory’s Queer Literary and Art Journal, and Genre and Visual Arts Editor for The Pulse Anthology. Bria is currently a student at Emory University studying English/Creative Writing and Interdisciplinary Studies.

Culinary Artist and Stylist S. Promised Gourdet.S. Promised Gourdet – Culinary Arts, Photographer, Stylist

Promised Land Kitchen explores the intersection of food, imagination, taste and community. Promised has partnered with community gardens, local food purveyors and food justice advocates in the fight for food sovereignty in under-served communities in metro Atlanta. She strives to address the urgency in addressing malnutrition and food insecurity in our communities, and the link between dietary habits and overall health and wellness.

Theatre Artist Rachel Graf Evans. Photo by Hoberman Studios.
Photo by Hoberman Studios.

Rachel Graf Evans – Theatre Artist, Composer

Rachel Graf Evans is a writer and theatre artist most interested in the telling of forgotten and silenced stories.

Rachel Graf Evans grew up in in Baltimore, Jerusalem, and Jakarta, before attending Quaker boarding school in Westtown, PA. After one year in the musical theatre performance training program at NYU – CAP21, she transferred to Oberlin College. She graduated from Oberlin with High Honors BA in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, as well as a BA in theatre, for the writing and composition of Vessel: A New Musical. RGE currently serves as the Dramatists Guild Regional Young Ambassador for Atlanta, is a member of Working Title Playwrights, and recently completed a Playwright Apprenticeship at Horizon Theatre Company. Her work can be read on the New Play Exchange.

Prior to Atlanta, RGE spent four years in NYC working in various capacities (including as playwright, producer, props designer, and/or performer) with New Georges, LCT3 at Lincoln Center, PowerOutNYC, Hot Pepper Theatre, York Theatre Company, Fresh Fruit Festival and Theatre for the New City’s Dream Up Festival.

She is an Associate Member of the NYC women’s barbershop chorus Sirens of Gotham.

AArtist Alison Hamil.lison Hamil – Visual Artist, Graphic Designer

Alison Hamil’s creative spark began at an early age. As a child, she was constantly building, sculpting, making, and creating. She fondly remembers doing imaginative things like constructing a robot entirely out of recycled materials on a whim, and holding an art show at a pop-up gallery in her parents’ garage. Throughout her childhood, she won several art contests, and decided to be a cartoonist in fourth grade. That didn’t quite pan out, but she wasn’t far off.

In high school, Alison realized that she was the only student not using ceramics class as an excuse to slack off, so she decided to pursue formal training and a career in art. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Georgia State University with a concentration in Drawing and Painting in 2010. She also studied the art of graphic design while she was in school, and now specializes in using what she’s learned to bridge the gap between technology and traditional drawing and painting.

Currently, Alison is a working artist in her hometown of Atlanta, Georgia. She has a diverse body of work including murals, sign painting, graphic design, paintings on paper, and drawings. Most of her work incorporates bold colors, patterns, symmetry, and bright colors.

Alison has been awarded several scholarships, and was named Best Emerging Visual Artist in Creative Loafing’s Best of Atlanta 2013. Although she is based in Atlanta, Georgia, she has painted murals in various places across the globe including Nicoya, Costa Rica, and Kefalonia, Greece, and several various towns throughout North Carolina. She has exhibited in Kibbee Gallery, Mason Murer Gallery, The Granite Room, MOCA GA, MINT Gallery and Gallery 1526, and she has been included in several art showcases in Atlanta, including the 2013-15 and 2017 Hambidge Art Auction and Performance Gala.

Plant Artist Erin Hayes.Erin Hayes – Plant Artist

After returning to Atlanta from teaching in international schools in the United Arab Emirates and Brazil, Erin Hayes found herself back in her hometown of College Park, Georgia eager to get involved in the revitalization efforts taking place around Atlanta. As a third generation educator, Erin has long realized the role that education plays in one’s life. Hailing from a long line of gardeners, Erin brings her varied interests in city development, education and horticulture as well as her experiences from living abroad to the forefront of her work. After the passing of a dear friend in March of 2017, Erin began to seek ways to honor his legacy by bringing city-dwellers closer to their natural world. She conceived the idea of combining enterprise, urban farming and horticulture along with education to address the accessibility gaps that largely affect young men and women in her community.

CArtist Christopher Jones.hristopher Jones – Graphic Designer, Visual Artist

Christopher Jones is the founder of SeeJones Creative, LLC, a creative services firm that helps mission-driven organizations and visionary leaders expand their reach through impactful visual communications. Notable projects include: a community mural in the Castleberry Hill neighborhood; helping a local co-working space to build a sense of community within its space through incorporating hand-drawn chalk murals on its walls; developing brand identity and marketing collateral for several non- and for-profit entities.

Christopher earned a BFA in graphic design from The University of Tennessee and an MBA in Marketing from Lincoln Memorial University. His career path has revolved around serving in leadership roles and providing corporate communications for non-profits. Chris feels that because of his background in service to his community, he understands the challenges that the organizations that he works with have faced.

Artist Krista Jones.

Krista Jones (“Jonesy”) – Graphic Designer, Illustrator, Muralist

Jonesy is an Atlanta based Graphic Designer, Illustrator and Muralist. She has over a decade of professional graphic design experience and provides services in print advertising and design, logos, branding, illustration, hand-painted signage, residential and commercial murals. Her public art can be seen in Decatur and Avondale Estates and her illustrations in local shops around Atlanta. She is a published designer, writer and illustrator. Jonesy’s artwork has been featured multiple times on the cover of Aquarius Magazine. Some of her clients include: Atlanta BeltLine, Unscripted Way, Sustainable Wellness, Aquarius Magazine, Brandshake Creative, Precision Performance Atlanta, Expression Chiropractic, Virtually Staging Properties, Lake Claire Community Land Trust and City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

Artist, Curator and Arts Administrator Tiffany LaTrice.Tiffany LaTrice – Visual Artist, Curator, Arts Administrator

Tiffany Latrice is an Atlanta based visual artist, curator and arts administrato. In her work, she seeks to understand the psychology of human emotion through the female body. The female body is used as a means to unveil the variety of emotions, especially the emotions that are hidden deep within a woman. She has always been passionate about women’s stories and how she depicts those stories on canvas. With a degree in international relations with a concentration in gender, culture, and global society from the University of Southern California and a masters in women’s history from Sarah Lawrence College, her art is a feminist statement that seeks to combat androcentric world views of women’s role in society. Through her compositions and texture, she tells the story of marginalized voices and systematic oppression. By the use of bold colors and vivid brush strokes, she moves women from marginalized spaces to spaces of power and agency. She combats objectification and commodification by allowing the viewer to undergo a journey through the elaborate imagery that she depicts on the canvas.

Tiffany is the Founder and Executive Director of TILA Studios, a visual arts incubator, co-working and shared gallery space serving female visuals artists in Metro Atlanta area. Located in East Point, GA, TILA Studios strives to be a place where women can work, collaborate, and exhibit to create a more inclusive art industry where women’s voices are heard and recognized.

Actor and Artist L S LewisL S Lewis – Sculptor, Fabricator, Writer, Actor, Comedian

Working in mixed media to accurately express the emotional language that underlies current events, L S Lewis’ work captures human processes in various struggles in a relatable and often humorous manner. L S has participated in several group gallery shows and has independently undertaken public installations. She resides in Atlanta, GA.

 

Ceramic Artist and Educator Bethany Pelle.Bethany Pelle – Ceramicist, Arts Educator

Bethany Pelle is an artist, craftsperson, and educator with over four years teaching experience at the university level. Bethany has twelve years of technical experience in support of academic, commercial and private ceramics studios. She is an ardent supporter of greater inclusivity, equality, and social justice. Bethany is currently an Adjunct Professor at Northern Kentucky University. Bethany brings a breadth of perspective and connections to the diverse art communities in Miami, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and New York.

The selected artists will present their final public presentation on December 16, 2017 from 2-4pm at Fuse Arts Center. Hatch artists will present group projects that represent hypothetical community scenarios which they may encounter as part of their work. Though the prompts are hypothetical, all are based on actual RFPs or Calls for Artists. These projects allow the artist to exercise skills learned in Hatch without fear of harm to themselves or an actual community during the learning process. More information and RSVP for the final presentations will be available online at c4atlanta.org/training at a later date.

For more information about the Hatch Training Intensive, please visit c4atlanta.org/hatch.

Announcing Hatch Training Intensive Selection Committee

Our Fall Hatch Training Intensive is right around the corner and applications are currently open for interested artists. C4 Atlanta is excited to announce our distinguished selection committee who will be choosing our next artist cohort for this program. We are excited to have the following esteemed public art professionals:

Katherine Dirga – Program Manager Arts Administration, MARTA Artbound
Brandon Jones – Head of the Creative Placemaking, WonderRoot
Josh Philipson – Principal Program Specialist, Arts & Culture, Atlanta Regional Commission 

Applications for Hatch close on August 14, 2017 at 11:59pm. For more information about this program, please visit the Hatch Training Page.

Click Here to Apply for Hatch.

Welcome Spring 2017 Hatch Artists

Artist Meredith Kooi setting up a participatory installation utilizing radio waves.
Artist Meredith Kooi setting up a participatory installation utilizing radio waves.

C4 Atlanta is proud to announce the twelve artists selected into the Hatch Training Intensive for Spring 2017! These artists will spend the next four months learning skills for creating art projects with community.

The Hatch Training Intensive was established as a training program through C4 Atlanta in October 2015. The course is a result of three years of collaboration, research and curriculum development with both national and local experts in the field of community driven art projects. Now in its third cycle, past participating artists have gone on to work on public art projects across the country and internationally. The program emphasizes skills in cultural organizing, understanding and establishing identity, identifying key community stakeholders, and working with community in ways that are sustainable for both artists and community members. The program also emphasizes important career development skills necessary to do social and civic practice work, including working with city planners, applying for RFPs/RFQs, negotiation and budgeting.

Photo by Anthony Gary, from his upcoming book, I Am Human. The image depicts 23-year-old Danny Thompson, a homeless man living in Atlanta.
Photo by Anthony Gary, from his upcoming book, I Am Human. The image depicts 23-year-old Danny Thompson, a homeless man living in Atlanta.

“Hatch is creating a pipeline of artists well trained to work in community development on both civic and artist-led community projects. Protecting both the interests and the integrity of community members is central to this program,” said Executive Director Jessyca Holland. “We also know that the artists involved need skills to protect their business and artistic interests in order to do this work, and that is part of their training, too.”

“We are excited by the diversity of experience and expertise that the Spring 2017 cohort brings,” said Audrey Gámez, Education Manager. “These are dynamic artists who span an array of ages, identities and disciplines. Their work is an expression of love for the communities with which they work.”

Artists selected to the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive include:

Lisa Alembik: A native Atlantan, Lisa Alembik is an artist, educator and curator. Her work focuses on spaces that are charged with histories of love and violence, the effects of loving and loss on the fleshy body, and issues of misogyny and women’s rights. In early 2016, drawings from her series titled “Murder Ballads” were exhibited in “The Green Mantle,” named after a chapter in Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, curated by Ann-Marie Manker at Kibbee Gallery, GA. Summer of 2016, a sculptural installation of plaster works, both abject and fetid, were included in critic Jerry Cullum’s curation “Garden of Unearthly Delights.” Among Alembik’s solo exhibitions are “In the Belly of the Whale” at the Arts Exchange, and “Solace” at the Spruill Gallery. Her work was included in exhibitions “Herstory” at the Memphis College of Art gallery, “Sex Drive” at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, “Pap Art,” at Truman State University, MO and San Francisco’s City College Art Gallery, and “The Last Taboo” at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia. Alembik’s curatorial projects from 2016 were “Lightweight” at the Hambidge Center for Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, GA and “This beautiful tangle” at the Dalton Gallery of Agnes Scott College. She is an associate professor at Georgia State University-Perimeter College in Clarkston, where she teaches the foundations of art, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional design, drawing and painting.

 

Rachel Garbus: Rachel Garbus is a theater-maker, writer, improviser and actress. A graduate of Smith College, Rachel is a native New Englander but is proud to call Atlanta home since 2013. She performs around town with Village Theater, Highwire Comedy, and the lit shows Write Club and Bleux Stockings Society. Her devised theater work – creating an original piece with input from all members of the ensemble – has taken her to New York, Haiti, and the east side of Atlanta. She’s never been one to turn down a fresh-baked chocolate chip cookie or a singalong. Rachel is thrilled to join the 2017 Hatch intensive!

 

Anthony Gary:  Anthony Gary is a self-taught freelance photographer. Mr. Gary is an Atlanta native whose love for photojournalism has lead him his most recent project producing a book called I am Human covering the impoverished population of Atlanta. Anthony also works in the local film industry as an IATSE Local 479 member as a motion picture grip. An active member of the local arts community, Anthony enjoys freestyle rapping as a member of Soul Food Cypher, writing stand-up comedy, and screenwriting. He is also a dedicated volunteer with non-profit organizations such Mission Dawgs, MUST, and WonderRoot.

 

Julia Hill: Julia Hill is an artist living in Atlanta, GA. She is owner and director of The Workshop, a mixed-use artist studio and makerspace. She enjoys facilitating creative visions, being outside, and playing with dogs. Julia’s studio pursuits include large puppetry, installation, metal fabrication, ceramics, and much more.

 

 

Brice Kennedy:  Brice Kennedy is a visual artist and graphic designer. A conceptual designer, his inspiration for innovation is a quote by another artist: “Anything can work!”. His work is influenced by relationships and personalities of those he has met through his travels. A native Atlantan, he spent most of his childhood playing in local creeks.

 

 

Meredith Kooi: Meredith Kooi is a visual and performance artist, critic, curator, and educator based in ATL. Using research-based and process-based practices, Kooi engages radio broadcast, performance, drawing, mapping, writing, book-making and zines, video, photography, and installation to illuminate the embodied nature of the electromagnetic spectrum. In recent years, Meredith has been working collaboratively, connecting with others in conversations, oftentimes broadcasting those dialogues on air. She is an artist-in-residence with The Creatives Project (2015-17), a Wave Farm Transmission Artist, Hambidge Fellow, and recipient of Atlanta’s Office of Cultural Affairs Emerging Artist Award (2014-15). Meredith is currently working on her PhD at Emory University in the Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts, received her MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2011), and earned her BA in Environmental Studies from Denison University (2007).

 

Lydia See: Lydia See is a multidisciplinary practitioner, educator, curator of art + archives, currently in residence as the first Artist in the Community Resident in partnership with HUB-BUB and the Spartanburg County Public Libraries. Working primarily with photography and fiber at the intersection of site-specificity and duration, her practice involves material and conceptual investigation through research and collection, and is rooted in history: literal and conceptual, local and global, intimate and environmental, personal and anonymous.

 

Muhammad Suber: Born in Yonkers, New York, Artist InUs (Muhammad Suber) began sketching at 5 years old and is predominantly self-taught. He uses color pencils, pens and markers to inject real-life figures into fantasy settings -creating superheroes out of everyday people in his work. His goal is to break into the video game industry as a 2-D artist and to create a nonprofit that trains low-income youth in artistic techniques and current 2-D and 3-D animation to increase the diversity of representation in emerging art-technology industries.

 

Giovanna Veltre: Giovanna Veltre is an Atlanta artist currently working towards her BFA at Georgia State University. She is a feminist fiber artist using knit, crochet, and dye techniques in reference to the body. Using unlikely materials like tampons, she celebrates both menstruation and birth in relation to female power.  She plans to continue her practice in Atlanta and hopes to one day open her very own an arts center.

 

Jacquay Waller: Jacquay Waller, a native of Memphis, Tennessee received his BS in Computer Science from Tennessee State University. Additionally, he holds a Master of Divinity from Emory University, MBA from Troy University and multiple professional certifications.  He is a classically trained bass-baritone vocalist and has been an accomplished member of AmeriColor Opera Alliance. He is a proud recipient of the James A. Hyter Award and the African American Playwright Exchange (AAPEX) Artist of the Year Award. He is also a member of Alpha Phi Alpha, Fraternity, Incorporated.  In his last year of seminary at Emory University, Jacquay produced and directed the show Coming from where I’m from. From here, his entertainment company DreamCatcher ENT was birthed. DreamCatcher produces theatrical experiences as a means for igniting community engagement with social issues.

 

Andrea Waterstone: Andrea Waterstone is a community-based public artist and the Director of Curation and Programming at Square Mile Gallery in Clarkston, Ga. She has served as the Arts Program Director at the Clarkston Community Center where she ran STE(A)M afterschool and summer programming. Andrea is a visual art teacher and multi-media artist who collaborates with teaching artists on fabricating large wooden sculptures, murals, recycled environmental art and mixed-medium Public Art. Andrea has designed and implemented arts based programming at the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, The International Community School, Jewish Kids Groups and served as a writer for the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for K-12th grade Art. Andrea received her BA from the University of Georgia in Studio Art and holds a Masters in Special Education/ Deaf Education from Valdosta State University.

 

Kacie Willis: Kacie is a Detroit-native who has been residing in Atlanta for the past 3 years. She holds her BS in Music Recording Technology from Hampton University and her MFA in Sound Design from Savannah College of Art and Design. In addition to freelancing, Kacie has worked at The Center for Puppetry Arts and Horizon Theatre and interned at Synchronicity Theatre and Theatrical Outfit. She currently serves as the Patron Services Manager at 7 Stages and enjoys finding ways to contribute to the community through creative collaboration.

Past Hatch participants have been busy putting their skills to use both in Atlanta and elsewhere. Lauren Pallotta Stumberg is the curator and organizer of the Moreland Mural Project, a public art project to be located at the corner of Dekalb Ave and Moreland Ave in Atlanta, which, when completed, will include murals by 22 female artists. Charmaine Minniefield recently wrapped her time as curator of the Foxfire 50th Anniversary Festival in the North Georgia Mountains. William Massey’s ColorATL project is working to provide coloring books for 1,500-2,000 Atlantans in transitional or medically urgent situations featuring the work of over 40 Atlanta based artists. Currently, you can find Michael Jones finishing his 100-ft long mural project near the Chamblee MARTA. And Beth West conducts a regular series of Social Justice Improv workshops around the Atlanta Metro Area.

C4 is excited to welcome our newest cohort and looks forward to the creative work they will bring forth to communities in our city and beyond!

Hatch Selection Committee Announced

Our Fall Hatch cohort deepens their knowledge of what is needed in a public art contract in order to protect their interests.
Our Fall Hatch cohort deepens their knowledge of what is needed in a public art contract in order to protect their interests.

We are eagerly awaiting selection of our next Hatch cohort for Spring 2017!

Applications are open and ongoing. The deadline for application is January 9, 2017 at 11:59pm.

We are proud to announce our Selection Committee for the 2017 Spring Hatch Training Intensive. We know their guidance will help in selecting a cohort of diverse and passionate artists ready to work in community. Our Selection Committee is:

Alex Acosta – Executive Director of Soul Food Cypher

Lauren Pallotta Stumberg – Organizer of Moreland Mural Project and Visual Artist

Rachel Parish – Program Director of Little Five Arts Alive , Performing Artist and Artistic Director of Firehouse Creative Productions

Saskia Benjamin – Executive Director of Art Papers

 

Applications for Hatch and more information about the program is available here: Hatch Application Page. For questions about this program, please email Audrey Gámez, Education Manager at audrey@c4atlanta.org. Please note: All questions received after 7pm on January 6, 2017 will be answered on January 9, 2017.

Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive: Community Hopes and Dreams

There was a full house assembled to watch our Hatch artists present their final projects on December 4, 2016.
There was a full house assembled to watch our Hatch artists present their final projects on December 4, 2016.

Over the past four months, thirteen artists have taken a journey with us to gain a deeper understanding of the nuances that define publicly engaged art through our Hatch Training Intensive. They have spanned a variety of artistic disciplines: painting, aerial circus arts, sculpture, jewelry-making, dance, printmaking, graphic design, performance art, fashion, literature, and so much more. However, all of these artists share a deep love of community and want to share their artistic practice. We are so proud to announce the artists of the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive cohort: Priscilla Alarcon, Maggie Benoit, Foluke Beveridge, Joe Dreher, Sara Gregory, Latanya Hardaway, Phil Harris, Shaun Martin, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson.

This particular Hatch session could be referred to as Hatch 2.0. After our original pilot program last fall, our staff wanted to incorporate some of the feedback provided by the pilot artists. The biggest feedback that we received was a need for a practical way for the skills learned to be applied during the learning process. We knew that having a chance to exercise and hone skills BEFORE working directly with a community was needed to practice the new skill set without putting students or community members at risk as “guinea pigs”. In order to support this goal, we made two major upgrades: the introduction of a Hatch Workbook and Group Presentations.

Sara Gregory and Foluke Beveridge consult their workbooks while finishing up work on their final project.
Terp Vairin, Miriam Robinson, Shaun Martin and Priscilla Smith consult their workbooks while working on an RFP exercise for Hatch.

In order to implement these changes, our staff spent two weeks (and some change) this summer solely on this one program. We made worksheets, wrote detailed explanations of exercises, created case study examples and revamped lesson plans in order to create a workbook that could be utilized as a tool by students even after the class ended. For the group presentations, we researched ACTUAL RFPS and Calls for Artists, as well as artist-led community projects to come up with our theoretical group project prompts. The involved artists were responsible for working together in small groups to create a plan for artistic engagement with community based on the goals and challenges outlined in the prompts.

 

On the whole, the Hatch program we created at the end of that three weeks was incredibly robust. The artists involved in this cohort committed not only to a four month training process, but also to a small amount of outside group work necessary to finish their projects. Classes met one weekend a month, with work due to complete their projects by the next training weekend.

Working together on a project added a necessary challenge for the Hatch artists. When working with community, artists must be able to work collaboratively in order to work with other artists, stakeholders, city governments, planning teams, etc. One group in particular became very adept at working around challenging schedules through distance conferencing and collaborative software. One of the artists in this group is also a firefighter who had to spend entire days solely at the firehouse. Other groups also dealt with scheduling, work, and personal issues that made collaboration a challenge. In spite (and in some cases, because of) their difficulties, these artists all managed to present incredible plans for community.

Each group explored a different prompt with a different community. Here are the prompts that were given to artists:

A visual documentarian recorded our groups ideas while they were presenting. These documentation board will be displayed at Fuse Arts Center.
A visual documentation recorded our groups ideas while they were presenting. These documentation board will be displayed at Fuse Arts Center.

1. Suburban City outside a major metro-area is looking to incorporate arts into their city planning. New development is now required to set aside a 1% for the arts. Traditionally the city has focused on visual, public art. They are now interested in expanding public art beyond just murals. The city has put out a Request for Proposal, with a start-up budget of $5000, for projects which can incorporate multi-disciplinary art (visual, performance, etc.) to engage community.

2. There is an uncontrolled empty lot in an historic city neighborhood which is known for crime, drug use, and vagrancy. The local community has been in conversation with private developers who want it to invest in the lot for a new parking deck for adjacent condos. The community is skeptical about the gentrification happening, and would like to see the lot used for something other than additional parking. How would you engage the community to find a solution to the use of that abandoned lot?

3. A rural community (roughly 10,000 people) has received a state grant to reinvigorate the historic downtown area to answer for the recent drop in population due to a lack of commerce. (Pick a reason: industry factory closed, decline in agriculture, better jobs elsewhere, etc.) This community has a rich cultural heritage, but there has been a lot of erasing of that heritage as resources continue to deplete. The Chamber of Commerce has ear-marked $3500 of the state grant to increase community vibrancy and reinvigorate the local economy. Devise a way to match these funds and develop stronger community pride through cultural heritage.

4. Local public high school has cut funding for after school programming, including the arts, due to limited funds. The school has a history of high truancy, low SAT scores, and high dropout rates. A group of concerned parents (7 families) are looking for solutions to address these issues. These parents are interested in developing a myriad of solutions which may not include strictly school sanctioned programming. Have your group develop ideas which represent the 1500 student body and include key stakeholders of the community.

Class Photo! Back row (from top left): Shaun Martin, Foluke Beveridge, Priscilla Alarcon, Beth West, Phil Harris, Priscilla Smith, Latanya Hardaway. Front Row (from bottom left): Terp Vairin, Maggie Benoit, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson, Sara Gregory. Not Pictured: Joe Dreher.
Class Photo! Back row (from top left): Shaun Martin, Foluke Beveridge, Priscilla Alarcon, Beth West, Phil Harris, Priscilla Smith, Latanya Hardaway. Front Row (from bottom left): Terp Vairin, Maggie Benoit, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson, Sara Gregory. Not Pictured: Joe Dreher.

The following recommendations were also given to the artists:

  • Consider government policies that may help or hinder you such as main street initiatives, tax allocation districts, and federal economic developments.
  • Find a local community which might be a model for your demographic research.
  • Once that community is identified, consider all stakeholders in the community.
  • Final presentations should be more about the process instead of the product. If an art project comes from your time in Hatch remember to stay focused on how you arrived at that idea.

I am proud to present to you the presentations of the thirteen artists participating in this cohort. Below you will find a video of their presentations to the public, which took place on December 4, 2016. Those interested in applying for the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive should consult the Hatch Training Page. Here you can find applications, training dates and more information on our program. You can also RSVP to our upcoming Info Session for interested artists on December 14, 2016 at 11am at Fuse Arts Center. Questions? Those interested in the program may reach out to me by email at Audrey@c4atlanta.org. Hatch is generously supported by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

Enjoy Hatch Artists Presentations:

 

 

Meet our Hatch Content Contributors

The deadline for the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive is closing in! We are so excited to meet our next cohort. In anticipation of the next training session, we thought you might like to meet some of the wonderful folks that have helped us to develop this program along the way:

CenterForward President Heather Alhadeff shares case studies with our Hatch pilot cohort about Art + Planning.
CenterForward President Heather Alhadeff shares case studies with our Hatch pilot cohort about Art + Planning.

CenterForward, lead by Heather Alhadeff, President: Places that people cherish and thrive in are ultimately achieved via rigorous and thoughtful dialogue across disciplines. Transportation Planning and Engineering combined with sincere and effective community involvement represent a collaborative and ultimately implementable decision making process – a core principle of Center Forward. With that philosophy in mind, Center Forward Inc was established in December 2012 as a transportation and land use planning firm.

Heather has over 19 years of Atlanta-specific Planning experience. Center Forward is a big proponent in helping the city integrate artistic principles into all stages of planning. Center Forward helped C4 Atlanta develop content that introduces artists to planning, trends in planning, and how the artist may fit into planning projects that engage community members and community stakeholders.

Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty's Daughter Arts Collaborative, speaks about Conscious Creativity.
Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative, speaks at a her keynote last March, Conscious Creativity.

Ebony Noelle Golden: Ebony Noelle Golden is the CEO and principal engagement strategist at Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative, LLC. BDAC is a NYC-based cultural arts direct action group that works to inspire, instigate, and incite transformation, radical expressiveness, and progressive social change through community designed, culturally relevant, creative projects. The Houston, TX native is also an accomplished performance artist, poet, director, and choreographer who stages site-specific rituals and live art performances that profoundly explore the complexities of freedom in the time of now. Ebony holds a Master of Arts degree in Performance Studies from New York University, a Master of Fine Arts degree in poetry from American University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in creative writing from Texas A&M University.

Attorney Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston, teaches our Hatch pilot artists about negotiations and contracts.
Attorney Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston, teaches our Hatch pilot artists about the importance of copyright.

Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston, lead by Jim Grace, Executive Director: The mission of the A&BC is to strengthen a vibrant arts community by providing quality direct legal and business services and ongoing educational programs to the creative community. Programs include business training for artists and creative entrepreneurs, pro bono legal services, nonprofit board service training and placement, microlending, fiscal agency, estate and legacy planning, human resources support, insurance programs, and corporate art lending partnerships.

Emily HopkinsEmily Hopkins is an artist and the executive director of Side Street Projects. Emily works to develop sustainable, community-based systems that connect working artists directly to communities.

Emily Hopkins from Side Street Projects talks about Expanding the Definition.
Emily Hopkins from Side Street Projects shares a quote by Pablo Heguera.

She is committed to hands-on, standards-based art programs for K-12 that appeal to multiple intelligences and incorporate into core curriculum. Emily serves on the art curriculum advisory committee for the Pasadena Unified School District (DAT CAT), and the advisory board for John Muir High School’s Arts Entertainment & Media Academy. Emily has a BFA & MA from CalArts and lives and works in Pasadena.

Katina Parker, filmmaker, pictured here during her time documenting Ferguson, MO.
Katina Parker, filmmaker, pictured here during her time documenting Ferguson, MO.

Katina Parker: Katina Parker is a Durham-based filmmaker, photographer, writer, graphic designer, cultural curator, social media expert, and communications consultant who has advised both the Ford Foundation’s Just Films and the Association of Independents in Radio’s Makers Quest 2.0 initiatives. Parker teaches social media and film through the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University and serves as an Instructor for North Carolina’s Community Folklife Documentation Institute.

She is the Co-Chair of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Task Force and the Vice President of the Association of Wake Forest University’s Black Alumni (AWFUBA) group. Prior to this Parker worked as a creative director in Los Angeles. She spent several years working as a Media Strategist for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), where she fine-tuned her public relations and communications savvy.

Clarkston Community Center Executive Director McKenzie Wren leads the artists through an exercise in asset mapping.
McKenzie Wren leads the Hatch pilot artists through an exercise in asset mapping.

McKenzie Wren: Mckenzie has a background in public health, alternative medicine and variety entertainment.  Since 2007, she has worked within the refugee community of Clarkston, GA – a community called “the most diverse square mile in the nation” by a NY Times article. She was previously the Executive Director of the Clarkston Community Center for six years. McKenzie uses arts-based and place-based strategies to bring about change. Her particular areas of focus are helping businesses and nonprofits strengthen culture through participatory processes and identify new processes for information and resource flow. She is a skilled facilitator who believes in the power of community to identify and solve its own problems.

The Hatch Training Intensive is specifically targeted towards readying artists to work in community-centric art projects in ways that are both sustainable and meaningful to all involved stakeholders. Deadline for application to the 2016 Fall Hatch Training Intensive is August 15th at 11:59pm. To learn more or to apply, see our Hatch Training Page.

Announcing the Hatch Selection Committee

C4 Atlanta is excited to announce the members of the Selection Committee for the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive. The members of the Selection Committee bring a deep understanding of community based artwork and years of experience. This committee includes a stellar group of arts professionals representing multi-artistic disciplines:

  • Joe Dreher (“JOEKINGATL”), visual artist best known for his iconic street and mural art. He is also an architect, photographer and poet
  • Angela Harris, Dance Canvas Executive Director and esteemed choreographer and teacher
  • Rachel May, Producing Artistic Director and an original founder of Sychronicity Theatre, an award-winning, professional theatre company based in Atlanta
  • Tracy Murrell, curator of the Hammonds House Museum and a multi-disciplinary visual artist

The staff of C4 Atlanta is excited to work with individuals who hold such diverse professional and artistic credentials. We could not have asked for a better team to help us select artists to participate in Hatch.

The Hatch Training Intensive is our newest program, designed specifically for artists working with community. Over the past few months, we have documented our pilot program, which you can read about here on our Hatch page under “Artist and Facilitator Blogs”. We were excited to launch our first Call for Artists for this program in June. The Fall 2016 program begins on September 24, and we can’t wait to meet our newest cohort of artists. 

Hatch will connect artists to vital information about how to approach collaborative projects outside a traditional studio practice. Under the program, participants will learn the legal, financial and “soft” skills necessary to effectively lead community-based art projects. Selected artists will participate in a four-month, rigorous training program with C4 Atlanta staff and experts from around the country, including Atlanta. Artists will have the opportunity to work with community builders, an attorney who specializes in legal assistance for artists working in public art, a city planner, and more. Applications and more details are available online at https://c4atlanta.org/training/hatch Deadline to apply: August 15, 2016 at 11:59pm.

Photo by William Massey III of Hatch artists in discussion regarding community and identity.
Photo by William Massey III of Hatch pilot artists in discussion about identity and community.

Hatch(ed) – Charmaine Minniefield Discusses Black Land Matters

In March, C4 Atlanta wrapped up a 6 month long pilot of our newest educational program, Hatch. This program is designed to help educate artists in the “soft” skills needed to perform art within a community context.

Recently, we at C4 Atlanta have heard of awesome new projects being created by our pilot Hatch cohort. As we are able, we would like to feature their stories of work within community.

Charmaine Minniefield is a visual artist in Atlanta who’s work centers around the African and African American ritual from a feminist perspective. She has also been an arts administrator in and around Atlanta nearly 20 years. Charmaine recently completed a mural project, in conjuction with a team of local artists, in Old Fourth Ward after the end of Hatch. Here is the story of her project, in her own words:

Photo by John Spink Sr. for the AJC
Photo by John Spink Sr. for the AJC

Painting for the Moment: Visual artist Charmaine Minniefield reflects on diversity and equity with her recent public art project in the King Historic District

I was recently granted the honor of being invited to paint a mural in the King Historic District for the Not A Crime campaign. This social justice campaign uses street art in cities around the world to bring attention to modern day Apartheid. The campaign recently made its debut here in Atlanta with the intention of making a direct connection to the Civil Rights history of the American south by inviting three Atlanta artists to create murals on a single building on Edgewood Avenue.  I was one of those artists.

 

The invitation came from fellow artist, Joe “King ATL” Dreher. Joe’s tagname speaks to his creative mission to uplift and reflect his hope for Atlanta. He sees our city through eyes of admiration and appreciation. His work, which is inspired by everyday folks walking the streets, has an element of hopefulness for our city and for our time. It was a great honor to have been invited by Joe King ATL to be a part of this project.

 

To sweeten the moment even more, Fabian Williams joined us as the third artist. Ok, see, I am a BIG fan of both Fabian’s artwork -which offers critical social commentary in the form of “contraptions” as of late- and his community work in the field to enable the artists of this city with his famous Art Battle events and other creative projects throughout the years. So, as you can see, participating with these two incredible artists, for this important cause, in the King Historic District, all meant so much to me.

 

When planning, the question of subject gave me pause. From my days as a producer with the National Black Arts Festival when we launched a Next Generation series and focused on the artist as activist; to my work with Hands On Atlanta and the King Center as the producer of King Holiday activities throughout the District for over 10 years; to more recently my own role in such social justice movements as Black Lives Matter and now the Not A Crime campaign, I knew that this was a chance to make my mark on the city as an artist activist.

 

The moment was right to counsel with my elders. I reached out and invited Civil Rights photographer, Dr. Doris Derby -an elder, mentor, and shero- to select the image. Her iconic work in the 1960s captured the importance of women in the Civil Rights Movement.  Given my own artistic focus on the power of women throughout history, the King District mural gave me the chance to realize my dream to collaborate with Dr. Derby.

 

Now the players were in place and the city was my stage.

 

I need to be clear about the state of the stage. The city had recently undergone a full overhaul of public art policies in response to the outcry of a community that felt disenfranchised by well-meaning artists and arts organizations. Our mural was in fact the first to go through the newly required rigorous process of community approval. Commissioned by the Baha’i Community Center, a longstanding faith and Civil Rights institution in the District, we were pleased that we were approved.

 

We began the work. I painted alongside Joe and Fabian for most hours of every day for a week to finish the murals. It was pretty cool as we weighed in and even painted on each other’s walls working together as collaborators. What was most amazing for me was painting in the King Historic District as an African-American artist, painting from a Civil Rights image taken by an elder and Civil Rights activist icon. I was intentional about these elements, given the recent changes in the District.

 

Once known as the hub of the African-American intelligentsia, the hotbed of the Civil Rights Movement and home to the birthplace, church, and final resting place of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the District was now known for its party scene and amazing public art, but also predatory investors with scrupulous practices of gentrification. I was in the middle of the area’s controversial efforts of urban renewal at, what some would argue, the cost of some of the most precious elements of African-American history and identity: civil rights, business and entrepreneurship, political participation, and land ownership.

 

NOW, I can’t say by any means that I have not enjoyed a dance step or two in the O4W. I too have enjoyed Beltline springtime walks and the prospect of a thriving economic district versus a dying one. But there is something alarming about the changes that I see in our city that are   in some cases at the hands of the arts, that I could not ignore when given the opportunity to represent in the District with this mural.

 

My work, my presence, my choice of a Civil Rights image, wedged between two iconic images all within a stone’s throw from Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, commissioned by a community whose founding members built the original edifice so that folks of all races could pray together – I knew my work needed to speak to the moment.

 

So I painted an image of everyday folk in Mound Bayou, MS (an all Black town) who took matters into their own hands to ensure their education in a Jim Crow south. I hoped to invoke their bravery and wisdom. I hoped their gazes would extend beyond the wall into our changing city, onto the landscape of development, welcoming newcomers with a reminder of struggles and victories passed, warning them of the importance of inclusion, remembrance, and respect as they celebrate hope and embrace a new diversity, breaking antiquated barriers of race, class, and gender divides, much like the Civil Rights and faith leaders before.

 

You see, I took this moment to return to the King Historic District not as a producer, but as an artist activist -to stand present as an African-American woman pushing back against the wave of erasure and development by remembering our history and paying respect to our ancestors by preserving, celebrating, and reclaiming their space and their stories.

 

I am grateful to the campaign for doing the good work of making sure the content of these murals gave an opportunity for equity to Atlanta artists whose works can ignite discussion and engage the community -past and present- in which the murals reside. I am thankful that the faces of the artists resemble the community and a hope for a united future, and that each image can encourage education and enlightenment, critical discussion, and endurance for those who reside in the King Historic District and beyond at a moment when we are reminded that not only Black Lives Matter, but Black Land Matters as well.  

 

Charmaine Minniefield

@BlackAngelATL

Hatch(ed) – Lauren Pallotta

In March, C4 Atlanta wrapped up a 6 month long pilot of our newest educational program, Hatch. This program is designed to help educate artists in the “soft” skills needed to perform art within a community context.

While our C4 Atlanta team is hard at work this week mapping out the final curriculum of our Hatch program (look for application details this summer), we wanted to highlight one of the pilot program graduates who has been utilizing her skills to produce artwork in the Little Five Points Community.

Lauren Pallotta is a painter, mural artist and graphic designer who’s work in community has, until recently, been mostly confined to two dimensional artwork. Through her recent project as part of Little Five Arts Alive, Lauren was given the opportunity to not only explore work in a new community but also within a new context. Here is her story in her own words:

 

Since 2016 began, I have promised myself to better align my actions with my aspirations. The result so far – I have become more integrated with my community through art. The kaleidoscope of my creative offerings gained new complexity when I joined the Little Five Arts Alive roster. With the encouragement of Arts Alive Curator Rachel Parish, my community mural idea evolved into urban place-making, which became “spontaneous sculpture” from upcycled materials. I was asked to make things from junk, to “set the stage” per se for the performances in the plaza. I was not in my comfort zone. So of course my answer was a bold yet shaky yes.

 

I’ve spent lunch hours dumpster-diving to forage for materials. William [Massey] graciously offered me advice on materials (Nothing spongy or water-catching, check. Bailing wire, check.) My plan was to be plan-less, to show up with materials and let the community be my guide. Focus on the process! On April 15, I unloaded the trashy treasures into the plaza – old electronics, computer cords, landline telephones, plastic car seats, modular shelving, CDs, garden hoses, fire extinguisher canisters, etc. – and got out some bright paint.

Community Members in Little Five Points help construct and create the artwork conceived by Hatch participant Lauren Pallotta.
Community Members in Little Five Points help construct and create the artwork conceived by Hatch participant Lauren Pallotta.

Then we made stuff. We made stuff with teenagers from the suburbs, train kids from “that side” of the plaza, a mother and daughter on a day out, a little girl who liked pink, a human rights canvasser on her break, passersby, tourists and locals. Ava made a peace sign with a garden hose and some blinds. Fred painted flowers on an old amplifier. We teased out the creative capacities of the community with random acts of art-making. By the end of the weekend, we had jazzed up the space to mirror Little Five itself: eclectic, vibrant and a little weird.

Creative Loafing called me a “sculptor.” I laughed. I am hardly a sculptor. But I did get to build some awesome new experiences because of the social, experimental and exploratory aspect of Little Five Arts Alive. I am incredibly grateful. It has let to new friendships, new projects and new vigor to keep living the life I have imagined.

By Lauren Pallotta

You can see Lauren’s project on display now at Finley Plaza in the Little Five Points neighborhood as part of Little Five Arts Alive, running every weekend until November. Little Five Arts Alive is a community building arts project produced in partnership between Horizon Theatre Company and the Little Five Points Community Improvement District. To find our more about Little Five Arts Alive, please visit www.littlefiveartsalive.com.

Documentation, Self Care and Community Organizing – Hatch Artists’ Blogs Part 2

Part of the ongoing Hatch blog series, today’s blogs are reflections by our Hatch artists on their experience from the previous weeks’ class by Katina Parker, documentary filmmaker and Black Lives Matter activist. A staff recap of the session is available on our blog.

For this class, we ask the artists to reflect on the following thoughts:

  • Referring to the slides from the presentations  – What is your position? Why do you want to do the work that you do? What are some of the challenges, privileges and “tools of the colonizer” you must be aware of in order to do your work?
  • What are some of your struggles with “self care”? Are there safety concerns in your work that you must be aware of?
  • How has documentation been a part of your artistic process in the past? Are there forms of documentation you wish to explore in order to more fully realize your vision or in order to best express the communities you are working within?

We hope you enjoy their thoughtful responses!

in my work, I am fighting for the right of existence and recognition of a people who have been erased from the social landscape of our times, who’s history and images are sometimes rewritten as a falsehood in order to serve the gain of a dominant culture. My work speaks directly against that omission by creating monuments of freedom in the face of this oppression.

One artist at a conference I recently attended asked the question of how do we affect change for an issue that plagues us as well – in her case, poverty. Another artist (a bit older) answered, we are all responding through our work to the social injustices that we all face and are affected by in our own homes and communities. My work addresses the erasure of women (micro) and African-American communities (macro).

Charmaine Minniefield, in a selfie outside the Zora Neal Hurston house.
Charmaine Minniefield, in a selfie outside the Zora Neal Hurston house.

This made me think of how when I recently visit the home of Zora Neal Hurston, I realized this small community of color had survived the encroachment of public use, eminent domain and land speculators just 4 miles outside of Orlando, because of their reverence by the author/anthropologist as a public folkloric study. This community she called home is still poverty stricken as if without the turning over of its land and equity, economic gain wouldn’t be afforded them. But because Zora saw their cultural value and told their story, they remain. Her stories saved them.

This is how I see my work. I can see it saving lives, saving equity, preserving the ethics of a generation. The weight of it can be heavy. My persistence isn’t always welcomed. Self preservation and pacing is important. It can be discouraging to resist a system seemingly insurmountable.

Regarding documentation, the nature of my project is documentation – recapturing lost narratives – past and present. I’d like to explore more medium as forms of documentation (film and digital moving images, religious expression, musical lore, dance traditions, oral histories). All this intrigues and leads my collaborative interests.

by Charmaine Minniefield