Tag: ArtoberFest 2016

Brewing Up Art: Meet Orpheus Brewing

We want to thank all of the amazing sponsors that are helping to create a spectacular celebration for ArtoberFest 2016. Our beer sponsor for this event is none other than local brewery Orpheus Brewing. Orpheus has a unique relationship with the arts community of Atlanta. Every can of beer released features the work of a local artist, many of whom are as recognizable for their gallery work as their murals lining Wylie Street and the Krog Street Tunnel. Notable featured artists include: Sam Parker, Lela Brunet, Molly Rose Freeman, Peter Ferrari, Dosa Kim, and Brandon Sadler.

Orpheus began as an endeavor by its founders to create the kind of beer that they couldn’t get anywhere else. First to roll out a canned sour beer in the state of Georgia, this brewery definitely embraces an identity that is new, different and unique. Get to know this local treasure and their finely crafted brews:

orpheus

Why “Orpheus”?

The luscious beer of Orpheus Brewing featuring artwork by Atlanta locals.
The luscious beer of Orpheus Brewing features label artwork by Atlanta locals.

As a name, Orpheus Brewing sprang mostly formed from Orpheus Brewmaster/President Jason Pellett’s trumpet career and the Real Book (an illegal book of unlicensed lead sheets that every jazz player in the country owns), as one of its songs is the lilting bossa nova standard Black Orpheus (the soundtrack from the 1959 Brazilian adaptation of the myth). Every time he would play or even flip past it, Jason was taken with the sound of the name “Orpheus”.  Once Atalanta and Lyric Ale (their first two beers in cans) were born and their story began, Voodoo Brass (original name evoking Jason’s trumpeting roots) begat Orpheus Brewing as Jason searched for a story that better represented the beer.

Orpheus employees hard at work in the brewery canning beer.
Orpheus employees hard at work in the brewery canning beer.

Strangely, Co-founder Andrew Lorber had the same love of Greek Mythology, as it was a major theme of his childhood in 6th grade home room at the Paideia School. When they began to engage the Orpheus tale again, he was taken by the depth of its imagery and relevance of its tragic lessons.

Each beer name has been a labor of love, research, and (of course) beer. The founders love that the richness of the underlying myth matches what they strive to put in your glass, and that their beer names will help the beer inspire iconic art unique to Atlanta.  Above all else, Orpheus guides their artistic endeavors.

What kind of Beer will be on tap at ArtoberFest?

Can art for Orpheus Brewing's Lyric Ale by local artist Peter Ferrari.
Artwork for Orpheus Brewing’s Lyric Ale by artist Peter Ferrari.

Lyric Ale

Saison

Label art by Peter Ferrari.

The beautiful music of Orpheus had power over the living, could move inanimate objects, and even hold sway over the gods. Lyric Ale is an ode to this profound beauty, which guides everything we do. We use a blend of hops from three continents and our house saison yeast to strike this harmonic balance of fruit and spice.

Hops: Hallertau Blanc, Galaxy, Azacca
Grain: Two row barley, white wheat, flaked wheat
Fermentation: French Saison yeast
ABV: 6.5%

Artwork for cans of Orpheus Brewing's Atalanta by artist Brandon Sadler.
Artwork for Orpheus Brewing’s Atalanta by artist Brandon Sadler.

Atalanta

Tart Plum Saison

Label Art by Brandon Sadler.

In the heroine Atalanta, we see the traits of what we aim for in all of our beers: piquant, deceptively robust, and a bit wild. A tart plum saison, Atalanta tastes of plums intermingling with spicy yeast, and a refreshing tartness that makes Atalanta as good for pairing with food as by itself.

Hops: Newport
Grain: Two row barley, white wheat, flaked wheat
Fermentation: House Lactobacillus Mother, French saison yeast
Other: Plums, cold pressed for us by Arden’s Garden
ABV: 5.25%

Thank to Orpheus Brewing for generously sponsoring this event and for their ongoing support of the artists in our community. Their core value of embracing what is unique and different are a reflection of the arts ecosystem of Atlanta, and we couldn’t be happier to have their participation for ArtoberFest.

Join us on October 20th, and raise a glass for artists in Atlanta! Get your ArtoberFest tickets here: Purchase ArtoberFest Tickets

Advance tickets for $15 for individuals, or $45 for couples (couples package includes 2 drink tickets) are available until October 19th. Drink tickets can also be purchased in advance for $5 each. Tickets at the door will be $20, with additional drink tickets available for $6 each.

Don’t Be Tardy for the Party! Meet the ArtoberFest Chefs.

As our ArtoberFest celebration nears, we wanted to continue to entice you with more features of our event sponsors. We are excited to announce the involvement of two rockstar chefs who will be preparing food throughout the evening. If you are a fan of the food scene in Atlanta (and who isn’t? what kind of artist doesn’t like to eat?), it’s time to get excited! Joining us for ArtoberFest 2016 will be:

Robert Velazquez – The General Muir

robert-velazquez
Robert Velazquez of the General Muir finishes dishes for a local Atlanta event.

Robert Velazquez is originally from Miami where he first learned how to roast a pig under his family’s supervision and developed a love of classic Latin flavors. He then trained in New York City at restaurants such as Momofuku Noodle Bar and Alder where he learned precision and modernist technique.  Upon moving to Atlanta he was a Sous Chef at Holeman & Finch Public House where he focused on butchery and charcuterie. In December of 2015, he joined the team at the General Muir as a Sous Chef and later promoted Chef de Cuisine. His eclectic flavors and techniques are a reflection of travel, passion and a need to push ahead towards something new.

 

Eli Kirshtein – The Luminary

eli
Eli Kirshtein of The Luminary outside his restaurant located at Krog Street Market.

Atlanta native and “Top Chef: Las Vegas” contestant Eli Kirshtein is chef/partner of The Luminary at Krog Street Market. Equal parts avid sports fan and accomplished chef, Kirshtein is a proud Atlantan and food anthropologist.

Kirshtein first tested his culinary chops at the age of 16, working as a protégé in the kitchens of Chefs Kevin Rathbun and Richard Blais. With an insatiable appetite for learning and advancing his experiences, Kirshtein sharpened his skills with stages at several acclaimed restaurants in NYC and at JOËL in Atlanta while completing his formal training at The Culinary Institute of America. After graduation, Kirshtein teamed up with Richard Blais at ONE. midtown kitchen before moving to Miami to work at Karu & Y. In 2007 he returned to Atlanta as the executive chef at Eno Restaurant and Wine Bar, from which he would take a brief hiatus to participate as a contestant on “Top Chef: Las Vegas.”

As a chef, Kirshtein has been featured in The New York Times, The Atlanta Journal Constitution, Food & Wine Magazine and even a special-edition issue of Marvel Comics’ Spider-Man series. He has served on the culinary counsel for the Atlanta Food & Wine Festival, is a member of the Southern Foodways Alliance and The Culinary Council of The Piedmont Park Conservancy. Kirshtein is also a proud supporter of the Atlanta Jewish Federation and Birthright Israel‎. Outside the kitchen, Kirshtein is a part-time sports writer and full-time SEC enthusiast.

In August 2014, Kirshtein brought his distinct style, perspective and technique to Atlanta’s highly anticipated Krog Street Market with the opening of his first restaurant, The Luminary. An American brasserie with regional influences, The Luminary features a classically inspired menu, large raw bar, craft beer and cocktail program, and 400-square-foot patio space.

 

Thank you to Eli Kirshtein, Todd Ginsberg, and Robert Velazquez for their generous donations of food, time and talent for this event! We are humbled by your generosity on behalf of the artists in our community.

Join us on October 20th, and taste for yourself! Get your ArtoberFest tickets here: Purchase ArtoberFest Tickets

Advance tickets for $15 for individuals, or $45 for couples (couples package includes 2 drink tickets) are available until October 19th. Drink tickets can also be purchased in advance for $5 each. Tickets at the door will be $20, with additional drink tickets available for $6 each.

“Love, Artists” and “Entartete Kunst”

exposure bucks parody image
This awesome image is by Sarah Lawrence.

There are always a fair share of questions that arise when any non-profit begins planning a fundraiser. Most of these evolve from the need to reach financial goals while supporting the mission. Arts organizations are always looking for exciting new ways to engage donors, often using art sales, pin-up shows, or silent auctions to reach those goals.

Credit: pearleden.deviantart.com
Credit: pearleden.deviantart.com

These methods have all proven to be great opportunities to support an organization’s mission while cultivating donors, but what consideration is given to the artists who provide the art that makes all that possible? Is exposure really enough?

As C4 Atlanta began the process of planning for ArtoberFest 2016 there were many questions which needed to be answered. We knew we wanted to provide more than just musical entertainment for the evening, but we struggled with what it meant to ask artists to provide work for our fundraiser.  As an arts organization, people expect something “artsy” at our fundraisers and events. There were many deep conversations which arose at our conference room table including:

  1. Who are we serving? – with the fundraiser and in terms of mission

  2. How does the fundraiser align with our commitment to Equity?

  3. How do we leverage our assets to better serve our community?

  4. What are we giving up? What do we hope to gain?

  5. How do we raise enough money to offset what we need to charge for classes and other services?

entartetekunstThe night before our ArtoberFest planning meeting, our Executive Director, Jessyca Holland, texted me letting me know there was a documentary she just watched called “Degenerate Art: The Nazi vs Expressionism”. This documentary covered Hitler’s infamous art exhibition entitled “Entartete Kunst,” or Degenerate Art. This exhibition opened to the public in Munich in 1937 showcasing 650 pieces of art which Hitler felt insulted German feeling, destroyed or confused natural form, and unveiled an absence of adequate manual or artistic skill. Over a million people showed to see these this exhibition which consisted completely of modernist artwork. Nazi Germany had now branded modern artists as enemies of that state and a threat to German culture. Hitler’s disdain for not just the art, but for the artists themselves ran deep.

Jessyca wanted to question the system today. In a very small way, we want to challenge the system by celebrating, not art, but artists.

Individual artists are undervalued by society, in comparison to art itself: while 96% of Americans value art in their communities and lives, only 27% believe that artist offer value to the communities in which they live.

*Society perceives making art as frivolous or recreational. Many artists report that people have no sense of what artists’ time or products are worth and often expect them to ‘donate’ both for nothing. – Urban InstituteInvesting in Creativity- A Study of the Support Structure for U.S. Artists. 

Those numbers don’t sit well with us.

“Love, Artists” was conceived out of the desire to demonstrate that artists are valued people. They are certainly valued by our organization, the staff, the board and our donors, but they bring tremendous value to their communities. Artists are humans, sisters, brothers, moms, dads, spouses, partners, friends, PTA members, volunteers…workers.

This post is not a judgement on other events, fundraisers, etc. but it is an exploration of how C4 Atlanta can better enhance our mission of serving artists. We work with many artists who gladly donate to arts organizations for events such as fundraisers, auctions, etc. Giving back is an ethos we support. This show was a challenge for us and is, in a way, a curatorial endeavor.

We did ask our members to submit images of themselves working for the show. In essence, they are donating work. We are not selling the photos during ArtoberFest. If an artists wants to sell his/her image, that is their prerogative, and they may keep all the money from that transaction. However, ArtoberFest’s financial success is not dependent on the sale of art. We will earn from the sales of tickets and alcohol. We have many generous sponsors that will make this a successful event.

Artists are donating a print of themselves working. The art is the process.

Unsolicited, photographer Cindy Brown, volunteered to take photos for artists who needed her expertise. She, too, is interested in the subject matter–an archive of sorts of Atlanta area artists. We have such a generous community, and we thank Cindy for her gift of time and talent.

We are fortunate to have a Board of Directors who also believes that artists contribute significantly to our society. So come party with us!

This blog was co-written by Chelsea Steveron & Jessyca Holland, C4 Atlanta

*This study was published in 2003. There have been some updates to the body or research, including a 2016 report conducted by the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Center for Cultural Innovation.