Tag: ATLarts

Meet the Panelist for Arts Journalism in the Digital Age

Join us on Monday, April 24, 2017  from 10:30am – 12:00pm for a free conversation on Arts Journalism in the Digital Age. 

We will discuss how the content, style and distribution of arts journalism and artistic critique changed as choices for journalistic consumption have increased. RSVP HERE.

MEET THE PANELIST:

Meredith Kooi  is a visual and performance artist, critic, curator, and educator based in ATL. Using research-based and process-based practices, Kooi engages radio broadcast, performance, drawing, mapping, writing, book-making and zines, video, photography, and installation to illuminate the embodied nature of the electromagnetic spectrum. In recent years, Meredith has been working collaboratively, connecting with others in conversations, oftentimes broadcasting those dialogues on air. She is an artist-in-residence with The Creatives Project (2015-17), a Wave Farm Transmission Artist, Hambidge Fellow, and recipient of Atlanta’s Office of Cultural Affairs Emerging Artist Award (2014-15).

Her art and culture criticism has been published in ART PAPERS, ArtsATL, ArtSlant, Bad At Sports, BURNAWAY, Dilettante Army, Temporary Art Review, Wussy, and soon to be Number. In 2014 she started the curatorial platform ALTERED MEANS, and from 2011-2016 she was editor and assistant director of Radius, an experimental curatorial platform based in Chicago.

Meredith is currently working on her PhD at Emory University in the Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts, received her MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2011), and earned her BA in Environmental Studies from Denison University (2007).

Twitter: @kooi_is_birdcage Website: meredithkooi.us


Floyd Hall is a cultural producer, storyteller, writer and documentarian from Atlanta, Georgia. His professional work often relates to the intersection of media and technology as platforms to bring cultures together and make the world a more fulfilling place. As an artist he is interested in the process of how we come to define and design ourselves, and is passionate about how history, culture and art blend together to construct narratives of place.

He has worked across the media spectrum in a variety of roles and capacities, including strategy, research and production; his current and past work spans several industries, including Gaming Retail, Brand Management, Nonprofit Arts, Social Change, Sporting Goods, Sports Media and Luxury Lifestyle.

Floyd counts the experiences of his Intown Atlanta upbringing, childhood summers spent in Augusta, Georgia and living in New York City as an adult as the primary influences on his life. Time spent in these locations gave him moments of clarity and insight about regional perspectives, the immigrant experience, how spaces influence patterns of life, and the imagination and ingenuity of different cultures.

Floyd is passionate about the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts & Mathematics) disciplines and holds a BS in Mathematics from Morehouse College, a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and an MBA from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business.

He has supplementary training in Radio & Television Broadcasting, is a Hambidge Center Creative Residency Fellow and has presented as a guest lecturer at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), Spelman College, Spelman College Musuem of Fine Art, the Hudgens Center for Art and Learning and is a media contributor to ArtsATL and Americans for the Arts.

He has produced over 700 podcast episodes covering Art, Pop Culture, Fashion, Sports, and Technology, and has worked with several arts-related organizations in the Atlanta area, including Woodruff Arts Center/High Museum, Flux Projects, ArtsATL, Spelman College Museum of Fine Art and WonderRoot.

Twitter: @floydintl Website: floydcreates.com Soundcloud: @floydintl


Laura Relyea is Executive Editor of ArtsATL. Her book, All Glitter, Everything, a collection of flash prose, was released by Deer Bear Wolf in March 2015. A portion of the book was included in the 2015 &Now Experimental Fiction Anthology, released biennially by the University of Notre Dame. Her essays, reviews, poems, and features have been published in The Bitter Southerner, Thought Catalog, Monkey Bicycle, Necessary Fiction, and elsewhere. Her book criticism has been published in PASTE, Fanzine, and Vouched Books. She was previously the Managing Editor of Scoutmob, and the Editor & Chief of Vouched Books. Relyea received a BA in Telecommunications and Creative Writing from Ball State University.

Twitter: @laura_relyea @ArtsATLcom Website: laurarelyea.com artsATL.com


Victoria Camblin is a writer, editor, art historian, and curator of public programming. She is the Editor and Artistic Director of ART PAPERS, a 38 year-old arts magazine and non-profit based in Atlanta, Georgia. From 2006-2013, she was Editor of 032c, a Berlin-based contemporary culture magazine, where she remains on the editorial board. Her writing has appeared in such publications as Artforum and Texte zur Kunst, in addition to a number of exhibition catalogues and artists’ books, and she has organized and contributed to public programming and exhibitions in Europe, in the Middle East, and in the southeastern United States. Camblin attended Columbia University in New York and the University of Cambridge (UK). She is a recipient of DAAD and Rauschenberg fellowships, and was the 2009-2012 Leslie Wilson Major Scholar at Magdalene College, Cambridge.

Twitter: @vcamblin @artpapers Website: artpapers.org


Stephanie Cash has been the Editor of BURNAWAY since November 2013. She was an editor at Art in America magazine in New York from 1993 to 2012. At BURNAWAY, she is responsible for all editorial content for the website and print editions, and for producing the Atlanta Art Guide, a free guide and map of current exhibitions and venues in the city. She also manages the Art Writers Mentorship Program, now in its third year.

Twitter: @stephanie_cash @BurnAwayGA Website: burnaway.org

 

 

Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive: Community Hopes and Dreams

There was a full house assembled to watch our Hatch artists present their final projects on December 4, 2016.
There was a full house assembled to watch our Hatch artists present their final projects on December 4, 2016.

Over the past four months, thirteen artists have taken a journey with us to gain a deeper understanding of the nuances that define publicly engaged art through our Hatch Training Intensive. They have spanned a variety of artistic disciplines: painting, aerial circus arts, sculpture, jewelry-making, dance, printmaking, graphic design, performance art, fashion, literature, and so much more. However, all of these artists share a deep love of community and want to share their artistic practice. We are so proud to announce the artists of the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive cohort: Priscilla Alarcon, Maggie Benoit, Foluke Beveridge, Joe Dreher, Sara Gregory, Latanya Hardaway, Phil Harris, Shaun Martin, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson.

This particular Hatch session could be referred to as Hatch 2.0. After our original pilot program last fall, our staff wanted to incorporate some of the feedback provided by the pilot artists. The biggest feedback that we received was a need for a practical way for the skills learned to be applied during the learning process. We knew that having a chance to exercise and hone skills BEFORE working directly with a community was needed to practice the new skill set without putting students or community members at risk as “guinea pigs”. In order to support this goal, we made two major upgrades: the introduction of a Hatch Workbook and Group Presentations.

Sara Gregory and Foluke Beveridge consult their workbooks while finishing up work on their final project.
Terp Vairin, Miriam Robinson, Shaun Martin and Priscilla Smith consult their workbooks while working on an RFP exercise for Hatch.

In order to implement these changes, our staff spent two weeks (and some change) this summer solely on this one program. We made worksheets, wrote detailed explanations of exercises, created case study examples and revamped lesson plans in order to create a workbook that could be utilized as a tool by students even after the class ended. For the group presentations, we researched ACTUAL RFPS and Calls for Artists, as well as artist-led community projects to come up with our theoretical group project prompts. The involved artists were responsible for working together in small groups to create a plan for artistic engagement with community based on the goals and challenges outlined in the prompts.

 

On the whole, the Hatch program we created at the end of that three weeks was incredibly robust. The artists involved in this cohort committed not only to a four month training process, but also to a small amount of outside group work necessary to finish their projects. Classes met one weekend a month, with work due to complete their projects by the next training weekend.

Working together on a project added a necessary challenge for the Hatch artists. When working with community, artists must be able to work collaboratively in order to work with other artists, stakeholders, city governments, planning teams, etc. One group in particular became very adept at working around challenging schedules through distance conferencing and collaborative software. One of the artists in this group is also a firefighter who had to spend entire days solely at the firehouse. Other groups also dealt with scheduling, work, and personal issues that made collaboration a challenge. In spite (and in some cases, because of) their difficulties, these artists all managed to present incredible plans for community.

Each group explored a different prompt with a different community. Here are the prompts that were given to artists:

A visual documentarian recorded our groups ideas while they were presenting. These documentation board will be displayed at Fuse Arts Center.
A visual documentation recorded our groups ideas while they were presenting. These documentation board will be displayed at Fuse Arts Center.

1. Suburban City outside a major metro-area is looking to incorporate arts into their city planning. New development is now required to set aside a 1% for the arts. Traditionally the city has focused on visual, public art. They are now interested in expanding public art beyond just murals. The city has put out a Request for Proposal, with a start-up budget of $5000, for projects which can incorporate multi-disciplinary art (visual, performance, etc.) to engage community.

2. There is an uncontrolled empty lot in an historic city neighborhood which is known for crime, drug use, and vagrancy. The local community has been in conversation with private developers who want it to invest in the lot for a new parking deck for adjacent condos. The community is skeptical about the gentrification happening, and would like to see the lot used for something other than additional parking. How would you engage the community to find a solution to the use of that abandoned lot?

3. A rural community (roughly 10,000 people) has received a state grant to reinvigorate the historic downtown area to answer for the recent drop in population due to a lack of commerce. (Pick a reason: industry factory closed, decline in agriculture, better jobs elsewhere, etc.) This community has a rich cultural heritage, but there has been a lot of erasing of that heritage as resources continue to deplete. The Chamber of Commerce has ear-marked $3500 of the state grant to increase community vibrancy and reinvigorate the local economy. Devise a way to match these funds and develop stronger community pride through cultural heritage.

4. Local public high school has cut funding for after school programming, including the arts, due to limited funds. The school has a history of high truancy, low SAT scores, and high dropout rates. A group of concerned parents (7 families) are looking for solutions to address these issues. These parents are interested in developing a myriad of solutions which may not include strictly school sanctioned programming. Have your group develop ideas which represent the 1500 student body and include key stakeholders of the community.

Class Photo! Back row (from top left): Shaun Martin, Foluke Beveridge, Priscilla Alarcon, Beth West, Phil Harris, Priscilla Smith, Latanya Hardaway. Front Row (from bottom left): Terp Vairin, Maggie Benoit, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson, Sara Gregory. Not Pictured: Joe Dreher.
Class Photo! Back row (from top left): Shaun Martin, Foluke Beveridge, Priscilla Alarcon, Beth West, Phil Harris, Priscilla Smith, Latanya Hardaway. Front Row (from bottom left): Terp Vairin, Maggie Benoit, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson, Sara Gregory. Not Pictured: Joe Dreher.

The following recommendations were also given to the artists:

  • Consider government policies that may help or hinder you such as main street initiatives, tax allocation districts, and federal economic developments.
  • Find a local community which might be a model for your demographic research.
  • Once that community is identified, consider all stakeholders in the community.
  • Final presentations should be more about the process instead of the product. If an art project comes from your time in Hatch remember to stay focused on how you arrived at that idea.

I am proud to present to you the presentations of the thirteen artists participating in this cohort. Below you will find a video of their presentations to the public, which took place on December 4, 2016. Those interested in applying for the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive should consult the Hatch Training Page. Here you can find applications, training dates and more information on our program. You can also RSVP to our upcoming Info Session for interested artists on December 14, 2016 at 11am at Fuse Arts Center. Questions? Those interested in the program may reach out to me by email at Audrey@c4atlanta.org. Hatch is generously supported by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

Enjoy Hatch Artists Presentations:

 

 

Content Marketing for Creatives or #CreatingTribes

As our next round of AIM is coming fast upon us, I thought I would take some time to talk about marketing. One of my favorite ways for creative professionals to increase their market and visibility is through content creation and content marketing. The Content Marketing Institute describes content marketing as the following:

“…a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly-defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.” 

Quite simply, content creation and curation allows your audience to interact with you based on the content you share through platforms like social media, YouTube, websites and blogs. The goal of content marketing is therefore not to sell, as in traditional marketing, but to cultivate a relationship with your stakeholders and find the “tribe” that is interested in what you are doing. It is that greater sense of loyalty that helps to build your customer base in the long run, by providing a destination for the folks with which you are looking to interact. Through content marketing, you can develop greater brand awareness, help build your customer base, provide added value to your work and services, and establish yourself as an expert in your field or discipline. Another plus is that content marketing is generally a very cost effective form of marketing and even more advantageous to artists and creative professionals working on small budgets.

So how do artists create and curate content? Consider the things you do as part of your practice that other people might find interesting. How you create work, how you run your business, areas or techniques of expertise and thoughts or articles that pertain to your career, core values or industry are all great sources of content. Even posts and pictures that tell more of your story or share your personality are great for getting your market more interested in you as an artist. Likely, if you find it interesting and it relates to your core values or your business, your target market will find it interesting too.

Wanna see how I curate content? Follow me! Twitter/Instagram: @allthatsmash
Wanna see how I curate content? Follow me! Twitter/Instagram: @allthatsmash

From there, consider your market and how you might best deliver this information to your audience or customer base. Your distribution channel should match where your stakeholders go to find information. For instance, concentrating your efforts on Facebook and Twitter might not be your best option if you are a children’s book illustrator (and this depends on what market segment: children, parents or teachers). Performing artists might do better with mediums that allow their work to be experienced more closely to how it is performed.

Content that creates exclusivity is also highly advantageous. As much as I am an advocate for accessibility to the arts, who doesn’t love the feeling of a backstage pass or a members only exclusive? The ability to create exclusivity helps to drive overall demand.

Keep in mind that this is about creating a relationship with those that consume your content. Relationships that are totally one sided don’t usually work very well. Dialogue between yourself and your target market is key to content marketing. So re-tweeting, using hashtags, answering fans’ comments, and being consistent (!!!!) are all important to making content marketing work for you. One more note about consistency – the moment you stop blogging, podcasting, or tweeting regularly is the moment you lose your audience completely. In any relationship, as soon as you break someone’s trust, you’ve usually lost their loyalty. So commit to the things you can keep up with. I have long thought a video series on how singers practice would be great for young singers and professionals. However, having no video production equipment or skill, it would be ridiculous of me to try this. There’s no way I would be able to keep up a regular, quality output.

If done correctly, content marketing can even lead to additional revenue streams. Services like Patreon allow patrons to donate directly to artists for the content they consume based on an amount they find sustainable. It’s also possible that as you establish your expertise in your discipline, others might approach you with opportunities to share you curated content as much as your artwork.

A new Atlanta startup will soon be offering a very innovative form of content marketing. VISIT is a new platform in which makers, artists and creatives can offer exclusive access to themselves through a limited number of phone call or Facetime interactions. Conceived as a limited edition, add-on purchase experience, each fifteen minute visit allows the maker and customer to share in whatever way they wish together. Still in beta, it’s worth keeping an eye on this new model as they launch their full platform soon.

Learn more about marketing strategy with us! Classes start October 20!
Learn more about marketing strategy with us! Classes start October 20!

And finally, content marketing is just one piece of your overall marketing strategy.

Concentrating on just one area of marketing can decrease your overall reach ability. It’s important to understand all the tools available to create a better marketing plan. Which is why we offer AIM, our three week course in Arts Marketing. In addition to content marketing, we also cover lean marketing strategies, social media, traditional marketing and so much more. Classes begin October 20th! Sign up here.