Tag: Hatch Training Intensive

Fall 2017 Hatch Training Intensive Artists Announced

Art by Bethany Pelle - The Good Feelings. Site specific installation of over 1,500 slip cast porcelain flowers created as part of the East Row Garden Walk in Newport, KY. Photo by Bethany Pelle.
Art by Bethany Pelle – The Good Feelings. Site specific installation of over 1,500 slip cast porcelain flowers created as part of the East Row Garden Walk in Newport, KY. Photo by Bethany Pelle.

C4 Atlanta is proud to announce the twelve artists selected into the Hatch Training Intensive for Fall 2017. This will be the fourth cohort of artists that have participated in the Hatch Program since it was started in 2015. Over the next four months these artists will learn skills for creating art projects with community, with a final culminating public presentation on December 16, 2017.

The Hatch Training Intensive was established as a training program through C4 Atlanta in October 2015 with the generous support of the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The course is a result of three years of collaboration, research and curriculum development with both national and local experts in the field of community driven art projects. The purpose of the program is to address the skills needs of artists working in a variety of community contexts. The artists work independently and in groups to build skills for a variety of different community work. While many of the artists who participate are already active in community projects, others seek out the program in order to gain the skills and vocabulary necessary for more specialized work such as urban development or planning projects.

Art by Tiffany LaTrice - In Memory of Mary Turner. In Memory of Mary Turner is a tribute to the life of Mary Turner and other women subjected to mob violence and<br />
Art by Tiffany LaTrice – In Memory of Mary Turner. In Memory of Mary Turner is a tribute to the life of Mary Turner and other women subjected to mob violence and lynching during Jim Crow South. Photo by Sarah Gormley.

A major program focus is building “soft” skills in cultural organizing, understanding and establishing identity, identifying key community stakeholders, and working with community in ways that are sustainable for both artists and community members. In addition, one thing that makes the Hatch Training Intensive unique from other community art programs is that it also emphasizes important career development skills necessary to do social and civic practice work, including working with city planners, applying for RFPs/RFQs, negotiation and budgeting.

“Through this training program, we hope to provide greater access to resources for artists doing community work,” said Executive Director Jessyca Holland. “We’re incredibly proud of the work our past Hatch artists are doing around Atlanta, regionally, and even internationally. ”

Star Taker. Lead Artist - Alison Hamil, with a team of 4 other student artist. Located in Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, the mural references celestial navigation in Ancient Greece.
Star Taker. Lead Artist – Alison Hamil, with a team of 4 other student artists. Located in Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, the mural references celestial navigation in Ancient Greece.

“We want to make sure that not only do the artists benefit from the training, but that they also benefit from working with each other so closely, ” said Education Manager Audrey Gámez. “There is a lot of hands-on group work in this program, which helps with developing skills for collaboration and broadens the participants’ artistic networks.”

Selection of artists for this cohort was made by an independent committee of public art professionals who work directly with artists. The committee included Katherine Dirga of MARTA Artbound, Brandon Jones of WonderRoot, and Josh Phillipson of the Atlanta Regional Commission.

Artists selected to the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive include:

Artist Angela Bortone. Photo by Haylee Anne
Photo by Haylee Anne

Angela Bortone – Painter, Video Artist, Arts Critic

Angela Bortone is a painter, video artist and freelance art critic. She mixes other people’s voices into her paintings and videos. Born in the Dominican Republic, Bortone was raised in Brooklyn and spent nearly a decade abroad in Germany before moving to Atlanta in 2002. She earned a BFA in studio art with a concentration in drawing, painting and printmaking from Georgia State University in 2010.

 

Artist Sally EppsteinSally Eppstein – Sculptor, Visual Artist

Sally was raised in Augusta, Georgia but her first real education was moving to New York City and going to school at the Fashion Institute of Technology.  Living in the city and being exposed to so much diversity with all the different nationalities and so many art museums was a huge part of her education. She majored in jewelry where she did both design and studio work.  After Sally completed the associate program, she moved back to her hometown to complete her B.F.A. at Augusta College (now Augusta State University).

After receiving her B.F.A, Sally taught art for 10 years to kindergartners through high school students in both public and private schools. While teaching she continued her art practice by selling jewelry and paintings throughout the southeast.

The biggest influence in Sally’s art has always been nature. Her latest series of paintings has focused on different feathers of song birds, birds of prey, and waterfowl. As part of her Artist-in-residence at the Blue Heron Nature Preserve she made an eight foot tall stainless steel feather sculpture. Sally sees feathers as being so fragile just as she sees our environment which has inspired her to be come a big tree activist.

Sally was inspired to start to do sculpture when she saw the Art on the Beltline and it is amazing how many skills that she had learned from her jewelry training have translated for her large totems.

Other achievements are getting into Vermont Studio Center, being awarded the first Artist-in-residence at the Blue Heron Nature Preserve, being awarded an Emerging Artist Award for the Gasparilla Festival in Tampa, FL and being a part of Art Leaders of Metro Atlanta with Atlanta Regional Commission 2016.

Artist Bria Goeller

Bria Goeller – Visual Artist, Sound Artist, Designer, Writer

Bria Goeller is passionate about art and social change. Bria works in a multitude of mediums including photography, film, 2D visual art, sound art, graphic design, creative writing and illustration/comics. Already a leader in her own right, Bria has been the Director of Design & Technology for TEDxEmory,  Executive VP of Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society, Executive Board Member for the Homeless Outreach Awareness Project, Founding Member and Design Chair of MR.MA’AM: Emory’s Queer Literary and Art Journal, and Genre and Visual Arts Editor for The Pulse Anthology. Bria is currently a student at Emory University studying English/Creative Writing and Interdisciplinary Studies.

Culinary Artist and Stylist S. Promised Gourdet.S. Promised Gourdet – Culinary Arts, Photographer, Stylist

Promised Land Kitchen explores the intersection of food, imagination, taste and community. Promised has partnered with community gardens, local food purveyors and food justice advocates in the fight for food sovereignty in under-served communities in metro Atlanta. She strives to address the urgency in addressing malnutrition and food insecurity in our communities, and the link between dietary habits and overall health and wellness.

Theatre Artist Rachel Graf Evans. Photo by Hoberman Studios.
Photo by Hoberman Studios.

Rachel Graf Evans – Theatre Artist, Composer

Rachel Graf Evans is a writer and theatre artist most interested in the telling of forgotten and silenced stories.

Rachel Graf Evans grew up in in Baltimore, Jerusalem, and Jakarta, before attending Quaker boarding school in Westtown, PA. After one year in the musical theatre performance training program at NYU – CAP21, she transferred to Oberlin College. She graduated from Oberlin with High Honors BA in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, as well as a BA in theatre, for the writing and composition of Vessel: A New Musical. RGE currently serves as the Dramatists Guild Regional Young Ambassador for Atlanta, is a member of Working Title Playwrights, and recently completed a Playwright Apprenticeship at Horizon Theatre Company. Her work can be read on the New Play Exchange.

Prior to Atlanta, RGE spent four years in NYC working in various capacities (including as playwright, producer, props designer, and/or performer) with New Georges, LCT3 at Lincoln Center, PowerOutNYC, Hot Pepper Theatre, York Theatre Company, Fresh Fruit Festival and Theatre for the New City’s Dream Up Festival.

She is an Associate Member of the NYC women’s barbershop chorus Sirens of Gotham.

AArtist Alison Hamil.lison Hamil – Visual Artist, Graphic Designer

Alison Hamil’s creative spark began at an early age. As a child, she was constantly building, sculpting, making, and creating. She fondly remembers doing imaginative things like constructing a robot entirely out of recycled materials on a whim, and holding an art show at a pop-up gallery in her parents’ garage. Throughout her childhood, she won several art contests, and decided to be a cartoonist in fourth grade. That didn’t quite pan out, but she wasn’t far off.

In high school, Alison realized that she was the only student not using ceramics class as an excuse to slack off, so she decided to pursue formal training and a career in art. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Georgia State University with a concentration in Drawing and Painting in 2010. She also studied the art of graphic design while she was in school, and now specializes in using what she’s learned to bridge the gap between technology and traditional drawing and painting.

Currently, Alison is a working artist in her hometown of Atlanta, Georgia. She has a diverse body of work including murals, sign painting, graphic design, paintings on paper, and drawings. Most of her work incorporates bold colors, patterns, symmetry, and bright colors.

Alison has been awarded several scholarships, and was named Best Emerging Visual Artist in Creative Loafing’s Best of Atlanta 2013. Although she is based in Atlanta, Georgia, she has painted murals in various places across the globe including Nicoya, Costa Rica, and Kefalonia, Greece, and several various towns throughout North Carolina. She has exhibited in Kibbee Gallery, Mason Murer Gallery, The Granite Room, MOCA GA, MINT Gallery and Gallery 1526, and she has been included in several art showcases in Atlanta, including the 2013-15 and 2017 Hambidge Art Auction and Performance Gala.

Plant Artist Erin Hayes.Erin Hayes – Plant Artist

After returning to Atlanta from teaching in international schools in the United Arab Emirates and Brazil, Erin Hayes found herself back in her hometown of College Park, Georgia eager to get involved in the revitalization efforts taking place around Atlanta. As a third generation educator, Erin has long realized the role that education plays in one’s life. Hailing from a long line of gardeners, Erin brings her varied interests in city development, education and horticulture as well as her experiences from living abroad to the forefront of her work. After the passing of a dear friend in March of 2017, Erin began to seek ways to honor his legacy by bringing city-dwellers closer to their natural world. She conceived the idea of combining enterprise, urban farming and horticulture along with education to address the accessibility gaps that largely affect young men and women in her community.

CArtist Christopher Jones.hristopher Jones – Graphic Designer, Visual Artist

Christopher Jones is the founder of SeeJones Creative, LLC, a creative services firm that helps mission-driven organizations and visionary leaders expand their reach through impactful visual communications. Notable projects include: a community mural in the Castleberry Hill neighborhood; helping a local co-working space to build a sense of community within its space through incorporating hand-drawn chalk murals on its walls; developing brand identity and marketing collateral for several non- and for-profit entities.

Christopher earned a BFA in graphic design from The University of Tennessee and an MBA in Marketing from Lincoln Memorial University. His career path has revolved around serving in leadership roles and providing corporate communications for non-profits. Chris feels that because of his background in service to his community, he understands the challenges that the organizations that he works with have faced.

Artist Krista Jones.

Krista Jones (“Jonesy”) – Graphic Designer, Illustrator, Muralist

Jonesy is an Atlanta based Graphic Designer, Illustrator and Muralist. She has over a decade of professional graphic design experience and provides services in print advertising and design, logos, branding, illustration, hand-painted signage, residential and commercial murals. Her public art can be seen in Decatur and Avondale Estates and her illustrations in local shops around Atlanta. She is a published designer, writer and illustrator. Jonesy’s artwork has been featured multiple times on the cover of Aquarius Magazine. Some of her clients include: Atlanta BeltLine, Unscripted Way, Sustainable Wellness, Aquarius Magazine, Brandshake Creative, Precision Performance Atlanta, Expression Chiropractic, Virtually Staging Properties, Lake Claire Community Land Trust and City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

Artist, Curator and Arts Administrator Tiffany LaTrice.Tiffany LaTrice – Visual Artist, Curator, Arts Administrator

Tiffany Latrice is an Atlanta based visual artist, curator and arts administrato. In her work, she seeks to understand the psychology of human emotion through the female body. The female body is used as a means to unveil the variety of emotions, especially the emotions that are hidden deep within a woman. She has always been passionate about women’s stories and how she depicts those stories on canvas. With a degree in international relations with a concentration in gender, culture, and global society from the University of Southern California and a masters in women’s history from Sarah Lawrence College, her art is a feminist statement that seeks to combat androcentric world views of women’s role in society. Through her compositions and texture, she tells the story of marginalized voices and systematic oppression. By the use of bold colors and vivid brush strokes, she moves women from marginalized spaces to spaces of power and agency. She combats objectification and commodification by allowing the viewer to undergo a journey through the elaborate imagery that she depicts on the canvas.

Tiffany is the Founder and Executive Director of TILA Studios, a visual arts incubator, co-working and shared gallery space serving female visuals artists in Metro Atlanta area. Located in East Point, GA, TILA Studios strives to be a place where women can work, collaborate, and exhibit to create a more inclusive art industry where women’s voices are heard and recognized.

Actor and Artist L S LewisL S Lewis – Sculptor, Fabricator, Writer, Actor, Comedian

Working in mixed media to accurately express the emotional language that underlies current events, L S Lewis’ work captures human processes in various struggles in a relatable and often humorous manner. L S has participated in several group gallery shows and has independently undertaken public installations. She resides in Atlanta, GA.

 

Ceramic Artist and Educator Bethany Pelle.Bethany Pelle – Ceramicist, Arts Educator

Bethany Pelle is an artist, craftsperson, and educator with over four years teaching experience at the university level. Bethany has twelve years of technical experience in support of academic, commercial and private ceramics studios. She is an ardent supporter of greater inclusivity, equality, and social justice. Bethany is currently an Adjunct Professor at Northern Kentucky University. Bethany brings a breadth of perspective and connections to the diverse art communities in Miami, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and New York.

The selected artists will present their final public presentation on December 16, 2017 from 2-4pm at Fuse Arts Center. Hatch artists will present group projects that represent hypothetical community scenarios which they may encounter as part of their work. Though the prompts are hypothetical, all are based on actual RFPs or Calls for Artists. These projects allow the artist to exercise skills learned in Hatch without fear of harm to themselves or an actual community during the learning process. More information and RSVP for the final presentations will be available online at c4atlanta.org/training at a later date.

For more information about the Hatch Training Intensive, please visit c4atlanta.org/hatch.

Announcing Hatch Training Intensive Selection Committee

Our Fall Hatch Training Intensive is right around the corner and applications are currently open for interested artists. C4 Atlanta is excited to announce our distinguished selection committee who will be choosing our next artist cohort for this program. We are excited to have the following esteemed public art professionals:

Katherine Dirga – Program Manager Arts Administration, MARTA Artbound
Brandon Jones – Head of the Creative Placemaking, WonderRoot
Josh Philipson – Principal Program Specialist, Arts & Culture, Atlanta Regional Commission 

Applications for Hatch close on August 14, 2017 at 11:59pm. For more information about this program, please visit the Hatch Training Page.

Click Here to Apply for Hatch.

Hatch Selection Committee Announced

Our Fall Hatch cohort deepens their knowledge of what is needed in a public art contract in order to protect their interests.
Our Fall Hatch cohort deepens their knowledge of what is needed in a public art contract in order to protect their interests.

We are eagerly awaiting selection of our next Hatch cohort for Spring 2017!

Applications are open and ongoing. The deadline for application is January 9, 2017 at 11:59pm.

We are proud to announce our Selection Committee for the 2017 Spring Hatch Training Intensive. We know their guidance will help in selecting a cohort of diverse and passionate artists ready to work in community. Our Selection Committee is:

Alex Acosta – Executive Director of Soul Food Cypher

Lauren Pallotta Stumberg – Organizer of Moreland Mural Project and Visual Artist

Rachel Parish – Program Director of Little Five Arts Alive , Performing Artist and Artistic Director of Firehouse Creative Productions

Saskia Benjamin – Executive Director of Art Papers

 

Applications for Hatch and more information about the program is available here: Hatch Application Page. For questions about this program, please email Audrey Gámez, Education Manager at audrey@c4atlanta.org. Please note: All questions received after 7pm on January 6, 2017 will be answered on January 9, 2017.

Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive: Community Hopes and Dreams

There was a full house assembled to watch our Hatch artists present their final projects on December 4, 2016.
There was a full house assembled to watch our Hatch artists present their final projects on December 4, 2016.

Over the past four months, thirteen artists have taken a journey with us to gain a deeper understanding of the nuances that define publicly engaged art through our Hatch Training Intensive. They have spanned a variety of artistic disciplines: painting, aerial circus arts, sculpture, jewelry-making, dance, printmaking, graphic design, performance art, fashion, literature, and so much more. However, all of these artists share a deep love of community and want to share their artistic practice. We are so proud to announce the artists of the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive cohort: Priscilla Alarcon, Maggie Benoit, Foluke Beveridge, Joe Dreher, Sara Gregory, Latanya Hardaway, Phil Harris, Shaun Martin, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson.

This particular Hatch session could be referred to as Hatch 2.0. After our original pilot program last fall, our staff wanted to incorporate some of the feedback provided by the pilot artists. The biggest feedback that we received was a need for a practical way for the skills learned to be applied during the learning process. We knew that having a chance to exercise and hone skills BEFORE working directly with a community was needed to practice the new skill set without putting students or community members at risk as “guinea pigs”. In order to support this goal, we made two major upgrades: the introduction of a Hatch Workbook and Group Presentations.

Sara Gregory and Foluke Beveridge consult their workbooks while finishing up work on their final project.
Terp Vairin, Miriam Robinson, Shaun Martin and Priscilla Smith consult their workbooks while working on an RFP exercise for Hatch.

In order to implement these changes, our staff spent two weeks (and some change) this summer solely on this one program. We made worksheets, wrote detailed explanations of exercises, created case study examples and revamped lesson plans in order to create a workbook that could be utilized as a tool by students even after the class ended. For the group presentations, we researched ACTUAL RFPS and Calls for Artists, as well as artist-led community projects to come up with our theoretical group project prompts. The involved artists were responsible for working together in small groups to create a plan for artistic engagement with community based on the goals and challenges outlined in the prompts.

 

On the whole, the Hatch program we created at the end of that three weeks was incredibly robust. The artists involved in this cohort committed not only to a four month training process, but also to a small amount of outside group work necessary to finish their projects. Classes met one weekend a month, with work due to complete their projects by the next training weekend.

Working together on a project added a necessary challenge for the Hatch artists. When working with community, artists must be able to work collaboratively in order to work with other artists, stakeholders, city governments, planning teams, etc. One group in particular became very adept at working around challenging schedules through distance conferencing and collaborative software. One of the artists in this group is also a firefighter who had to spend entire days solely at the firehouse. Other groups also dealt with scheduling, work, and personal issues that made collaboration a challenge. In spite (and in some cases, because of) their difficulties, these artists all managed to present incredible plans for community.

Each group explored a different prompt with a different community. Here are the prompts that were given to artists:

A visual documentarian recorded our groups ideas while they were presenting. These documentation board will be displayed at Fuse Arts Center.
A visual documentation recorded our groups ideas while they were presenting. These documentation board will be displayed at Fuse Arts Center.

1. Suburban City outside a major metro-area is looking to incorporate arts into their city planning. New development is now required to set aside a 1% for the arts. Traditionally the city has focused on visual, public art. They are now interested in expanding public art beyond just murals. The city has put out a Request for Proposal, with a start-up budget of $5000, for projects which can incorporate multi-disciplinary art (visual, performance, etc.) to engage community.

2. There is an uncontrolled empty lot in an historic city neighborhood which is known for crime, drug use, and vagrancy. The local community has been in conversation with private developers who want it to invest in the lot for a new parking deck for adjacent condos. The community is skeptical about the gentrification happening, and would like to see the lot used for something other than additional parking. How would you engage the community to find a solution to the use of that abandoned lot?

3. A rural community (roughly 10,000 people) has received a state grant to reinvigorate the historic downtown area to answer for the recent drop in population due to a lack of commerce. (Pick a reason: industry factory closed, decline in agriculture, better jobs elsewhere, etc.) This community has a rich cultural heritage, but there has been a lot of erasing of that heritage as resources continue to deplete. The Chamber of Commerce has ear-marked $3500 of the state grant to increase community vibrancy and reinvigorate the local economy. Devise a way to match these funds and develop stronger community pride through cultural heritage.

4. Local public high school has cut funding for after school programming, including the arts, due to limited funds. The school has a history of high truancy, low SAT scores, and high dropout rates. A group of concerned parents (7 families) are looking for solutions to address these issues. These parents are interested in developing a myriad of solutions which may not include strictly school sanctioned programming. Have your group develop ideas which represent the 1500 student body and include key stakeholders of the community.

Class Photo! Back row (from top left): Shaun Martin, Foluke Beveridge, Priscilla Alarcon, Beth West, Phil Harris, Priscilla Smith, Latanya Hardaway. Front Row (from bottom left): Terp Vairin, Maggie Benoit, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson, Sara Gregory. Not Pictured: Joe Dreher.
Class Photo! Back row (from top left): Shaun Martin, Foluke Beveridge, Priscilla Alarcon, Beth West, Phil Harris, Priscilla Smith, Latanya Hardaway. Front Row (from bottom left): Terp Vairin, Maggie Benoit, Lennie Gray Mowris, Miriam Robinson, Sara Gregory. Not Pictured: Joe Dreher.

The following recommendations were also given to the artists:

  • Consider government policies that may help or hinder you such as main street initiatives, tax allocation districts, and federal economic developments.
  • Find a local community which might be a model for your demographic research.
  • Once that community is identified, consider all stakeholders in the community.
  • Final presentations should be more about the process instead of the product. If an art project comes from your time in Hatch remember to stay focused on how you arrived at that idea.

I am proud to present to you the presentations of the thirteen artists participating in this cohort. Below you will find a video of their presentations to the public, which took place on December 4, 2016. Those interested in applying for the Spring 2017 Hatch Training Intensive should consult the Hatch Training Page. Here you can find applications, training dates and more information on our program. You can also RSVP to our upcoming Info Session for interested artists on December 14, 2016 at 11am at Fuse Arts Center. Questions? Those interested in the program may reach out to me by email at Audrey@c4atlanta.org. Hatch is generously supported by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

Enjoy Hatch Artists Presentations:

 

 

Behind the scenes – What goes into making your classes?

A rare photo of me facilitating during Lesson One of our Fall Hatch session. As Education Manager, I'm normally the one behind the camera.
A rare photo of me facilitating during Lesson One of our Fall Hatch session. As Education Manager, I’m normally the one behind the camera.

I love my job. I get to work with artists and help create and manage education that can support their ability to achieve their hopes and dreams. Those hopes and dreams contribute to making an incredibly diverse and creative arts ecology for our community, from which everyone benefits. Each year, C4 Atlanta services over 400 artists through our training services. That’s a LOT of creative hopes and dreams for Metro Atlanta!

In order to service the city’s musicians, painters, circus artists, dancers, film producers, tattoo artists, actors, and more! A lot of thought and preparation goes into what we offer. As former artists ourselves, our staff understands that where you put your (often very) hard earned dollars makes a huge difference, and we are committed to offering as high a standard of adult education as possible. What goes into that? An awful lot.

All too often being a good educator is equated with expertise in a particular content area. But all of us at some point in our lives know that this simply isn’t true. Each of us have been “trained” at some point by an expert who wasn’t actually skilled at education: a trainer who couldn’t explain to you what they were doing, a professor who’s MO seems to be “read the book, and figure it out for yourself”, or a brilliant musician who can’t seem comprehend how to translate their talent to a young student.

In addition to our almost 20 years of combined experience in education, our staff puts and incredible amount of infrastructure behind each class that we offer. So what DOES it take to plan and produce class at C4 Atlanta? Let’s take a look.

Most of our classes start with suggestions from our students. Every educational offering includes an evaluation, and every evaluation includes a question asking “What other educational offerings would you like to see in the future?” Some of our best courses have come from suggestions from artists like YOU!

Let’s assume that we’ve already done the funding legwork to ensure that we have the finances in place to even create a class in the first place. Often this is the longest part of the process. Securing grant funding make take years depending on the program. This can also include the time it takes to develop a relationship with and introduce our organization to a funder who has an interest in the type of education we’d like to offer. Other classes are developed with more agility. We test a concept, get feedback, and expand on it until it becomes a full course offering.

Chelsea facilitates Financial Literacy. She really loves to talk about numbers!
Chelsea facilitates Financial Literacy. She really loves to talk about numbers!

In order to develop a class, we first need to start with visioning the objectives and expectations. What are our goals for student learning and what skills will students walk away with? What is a reasonable given student expectations and feedback? What information is relevant and current? What do we want the class to look and feel like? What kind of student experience will it offer? What kind of time frame is reasonable; is the class a one day offering or will the content require several sessions to cover adequately?

One of the original lesson plans for our Hatch class. This course took over three years to develop, from initial planning to final implementation.
One of the original lesson plans for our Hatch class. This course took over three years to develop, from initial planning to final implementation.

In order to more fully form our overall course objectives, some research is usually necessary. Our staff regularly stays on top of the most relevant research in the field, and what information may be on the horizon to contribute to our learning opportunities. It is important for us to be aware of what is trending in the field and how the needs of working artists may be changing over time.  We are also fortunate to have a wide network nationwide of friends in the field to help point us toward additional information when we need it. In some cases, these friends have also become content collaborators or class partners.

Once overall class objectives have been identified, we can then begin to create lesson plans. For a multi-week class such as Ignite or Hatch, we can break up the course objectives into individual classes, each with it’s own individual lesson plan. For a one day or pop-up class, one single lesson plan is usually all that’s necessary. In our lesson plans, we identify specific learning outcomes for each individual class (based on our larger class objective(s)), activities and modules to be presented, outside support materials for the facilitator for more information, evaluation criteria for both the students and the facilitator, and a list of facilitator and student materials needed to execute the class. Having a strong, robust lesson plan makes our next steps much easier, so we work hard to make sure we get it right.

A student hard at work completing an exercise during Fundraising 101. It's important to include opportunities for hands on learning, no matter what class we create.
A student hard at work completing an exercise during Fundraising 101. It’s important to include opportunities for hands on learning, no matter what class we create.

From these initial lesson plans, we then begin to think about what is called an implementation plan. This is different from our lesson plan in that in addition to more specific detail, it also includes a breakdown of the timing of each section of a lesson. Specific case studies, anecdotes, concepts, discussion questions, or activities are outlined in the implementation plan, as are time for evaluations, introduction and/or closing rituals. This implementation agenda allows the course facilitator to effectively pace the learning of the class. It also allows those building the lesson to make reasonable expectations for learning, plan necessary breaks in learning in ways that will not disrupt the content delivery, and map out a student’s expected learning trajectory.  It’s important for concepts to build upon each other, and for students to have ample opportunities to practice the skills they are learning, and it’s important for this to be built into the design of the class from the beginning.

In our courses, it’s also important to us that students are building a network of colleagues and resources beyond what is provided in the content. Ample time for course discussion is factored into the implementation plan as well.

With strong plans laid, we can then begin to build presentations and supplementary learning materials for our classes. Powerpoints, workbooks, worksheets, exercise write-ups, and graphs or charts are created. Additional write-ups or notes may need to be included here for the class facilitator as well. The learning environment can also affect how we reach learners who have specific learning or ability challenges. The more that modifications or learning designs that can facilitate learning for a multitude of individuals and learning styles can be anticipated, the stronger overall our class will be for all students. To this end, our staff is currently researching Universal Design for Learning, with plans to incorporate this into all of our classes in the future. This is a core tenant of our upcoming strategic plan for the next five years.

Preparing workbooks for Ignite.
Preparing workbooks for Ignite.

Is the class ready to go yet? Nope. It’s time for a consistency check. Everything we have created needs to now be proofed. We’re not just looking for typos and grammatical errors, but also checking to make sure that what we have created theoretically works in a practical format: Did we cover the objectives we identified adequately? Are our timings correct? Should certain concepts be moved in order to facilitate better learning? Have we included a good mix of traditional instruction and activity? Did we plan enough time for breaks? Are the chosen visuals clear and representational of the concepts we are covering? Our implementation or lesson plans may need to be tweaked at this point depending on the changes that are necessary.

Now that the format of the course is complete, we’ll need a way to measure our efficacy at meeting our learning objectives, as well as our course facilitator’s ability to connect and share the content with the class. Course evaluations are an important part of each class. Questions are matched not only with the course objectives, but also with information that could be beneficial when evaluating our overall offerings and services. In the future, we hope to a create a unified assessment plan that includes all of our organizational assessment and evaluation goals and integrates with each individual course evaluation. As a core tenant of our new strategic plan, this will allow us to not only assess learning in a single class, but also to see how an artists’ learning in a single class incorporates with our larger service goals for the community.

It’s also time to begin thinking about class touch points. How are we reaching out to students who will be in the class? If you’ve taken a workshop with us, you know that we traditionally include a welcome and follow up to each lesson, and build a bank of additional resources for students. Chelsea, our operations manager, often helps with getting the resources online, while I maintain them for consistency, switching out certain tools or studies for newer versions. There may also be check-ins mid-course or other reminders necessary for upcoming class dates or homework. And our staff is always available for individual questions or clarity as it relates to our educational offerings. Moving into 2017, we will be remapping Ignite and creating a day-long training session for Ignite artist-facilitators. We hire artists who demonstrate a competency for teaching, breaking down complicated concepts, and who are earnest listeners to help facilitate Ignite and AIM Atlanta. For consistency, we spend a considerable amount of time for these artists to train alongside a staff member or long-time trainer.

Jessyca Holland
Photo of our ED. She would only approve this image. To be fair, she was working on a class design.

All of these considerations, research and planning go the creation of each and everyone one of our professional development offerings. But once the course is created, we never stop updating and improving. As trends change and research is released, our staff continues to work on education. We are committed to providing a high quality, inclusive, accessible learning experience to any and all who walk through our doors.

I’d like to close with that final point: accessibility. The cost of providing such a high quality educational experience is great. In an effort to keep course costs low, C4 Atlanta fundraises throughout the year. While we receive money from government, corporations, individuals, and foundations who believe in our mission to support the careers of arts workers, we also know that for some, any cost associated with professional development education is too great to bare. These are often the artists most in need of our services. In order to keep our classes accessible, C4 Atlanta offers an additional $10,000 in scholarships each year for training and education. Please consider making a contribution to our scholarship fund as we raise money through Power2Give through December 21st. The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs will match, dollar for dollar, each donation given, doubling even the smallest of gifts to make them twice as impactful. Donate here: Donate to C4 Atlanta Scholarship Fund

Have a suggestion for a learning opportunity that you’d like to see at C4 Atlanta? Email me: audrey@c4atlanta.org

 

Announcing the Hatch Selection Committee

C4 Atlanta is excited to announce the members of the Selection Committee for the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive. The members of the Selection Committee bring a deep understanding of community based artwork and years of experience. This committee includes a stellar group of arts professionals representing multi-artistic disciplines:

  • Joe Dreher (“JOEKINGATL”), visual artist best known for his iconic street and mural art. He is also an architect, photographer and poet
  • Angela Harris, Dance Canvas Executive Director and esteemed choreographer and teacher
  • Rachel May, Producing Artistic Director and an original founder of Sychronicity Theatre, an award-winning, professional theatre company based in Atlanta
  • Tracy Murrell, curator of the Hammonds House Museum and a multi-disciplinary visual artist

The staff of C4 Atlanta is excited to work with individuals who hold such diverse professional and artistic credentials. We could not have asked for a better team to help us select artists to participate in Hatch.

The Hatch Training Intensive is our newest program, designed specifically for artists working with community. Over the past few months, we have documented our pilot program, which you can read about here on our Hatch page under “Artist and Facilitator Blogs”. We were excited to launch our first Call for Artists for this program in June. The Fall 2016 program begins on September 24, and we can’t wait to meet our newest cohort of artists. 

Hatch will connect artists to vital information about how to approach collaborative projects outside a traditional studio practice. Under the program, participants will learn the legal, financial and “soft” skills necessary to effectively lead community-based art projects. Selected artists will participate in a four-month, rigorous training program with C4 Atlanta staff and experts from around the country, including Atlanta. Artists will have the opportunity to work with community builders, an attorney who specializes in legal assistance for artists working in public art, a city planner, and more. Applications and more details are available online at https://c4atlanta.org/training/hatch Deadline to apply: August 15, 2016 at 11:59pm.

Photo by William Massey III of Hatch artists in discussion regarding community and identity.
Photo by William Massey III of Hatch pilot artists in discussion about identity and community.