Tag: Jim Grace

Meet our Hatch Content Contributors

The deadline for the Fall 2016 Hatch Training Intensive is closing in! We are so excited to meet our next cohort. In anticipation of the next training session, we thought you might like to meet some of the wonderful folks that have helped us to develop this program along the way:

CenterForward President Heather Alhadeff shares case studies with our Hatch pilot cohort about Art + Planning.
CenterForward President Heather Alhadeff shares case studies with our Hatch pilot cohort about Art + Planning.

CenterForward, lead by Heather Alhadeff, President: Places that people cherish and thrive in are ultimately achieved via rigorous and thoughtful dialogue across disciplines. Transportation Planning and Engineering combined with sincere and effective community involvement represent a collaborative and ultimately implementable decision making process – a core principle of Center Forward. With that philosophy in mind, Center Forward Inc was established in December 2012 as a transportation and land use planning firm.

Heather has over 19 years of Atlanta-specific Planning experience. Center Forward is a big proponent in helping the city integrate artistic principles into all stages of planning. Center Forward helped C4 Atlanta develop content that introduces artists to planning, trends in planning, and how the artist may fit into planning projects that engage community members and community stakeholders.

Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty's Daughter Arts Collaborative, speaks about Conscious Creativity.
Ebony Noelle Golden, CEO of Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative, speaks at a her keynote last March, Conscious Creativity.

Ebony Noelle Golden: Ebony Noelle Golden is the CEO and principal engagement strategist at Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative, LLC. BDAC is a NYC-based cultural arts direct action group that works to inspire, instigate, and incite transformation, radical expressiveness, and progressive social change through community designed, culturally relevant, creative projects. The Houston, TX native is also an accomplished performance artist, poet, director, and choreographer who stages site-specific rituals and live art performances that profoundly explore the complexities of freedom in the time of now. Ebony holds a Master of Arts degree in Performance Studies from New York University, a Master of Fine Arts degree in poetry from American University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in creative writing from Texas A&M University.

Attorney Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston, teaches our Hatch pilot artists about negotiations and contracts.
Attorney Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston, teaches our Hatch pilot artists about the importance of copyright.

Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston, lead by Jim Grace, Executive Director: The mission of the A&BC is to strengthen a vibrant arts community by providing quality direct legal and business services and ongoing educational programs to the creative community. Programs include business training for artists and creative entrepreneurs, pro bono legal services, nonprofit board service training and placement, microlending, fiscal agency, estate and legacy planning, human resources support, insurance programs, and corporate art lending partnerships.

Emily HopkinsEmily Hopkins is an artist and the executive director of Side Street Projects. Emily works to develop sustainable, community-based systems that connect working artists directly to communities.

Emily Hopkins from Side Street Projects talks about Expanding the Definition.
Emily Hopkins from Side Street Projects shares a quote by Pablo Heguera.

She is committed to hands-on, standards-based art programs for K-12 that appeal to multiple intelligences and incorporate into core curriculum. Emily serves on the art curriculum advisory committee for the Pasadena Unified School District (DAT CAT), and the advisory board for John Muir High School’s Arts Entertainment & Media Academy. Emily has a BFA & MA from CalArts and lives and works in Pasadena.

Katina Parker, filmmaker, pictured here during her time documenting Ferguson, MO.
Katina Parker, filmmaker, pictured here during her time documenting Ferguson, MO.

Katina Parker: Katina Parker is a Durham-based filmmaker, photographer, writer, graphic designer, cultural curator, social media expert, and communications consultant who has advised both the Ford Foundation’s Just Films and the Association of Independents in Radio’s Makers Quest 2.0 initiatives. Parker teaches social media and film through the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University and serves as an Instructor for North Carolina’s Community Folklife Documentation Institute.

She is the Co-Chair of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Task Force and the Vice President of the Association of Wake Forest University’s Black Alumni (AWFUBA) group. Prior to this Parker worked as a creative director in Los Angeles. She spent several years working as a Media Strategist for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), where she fine-tuned her public relations and communications savvy.

Clarkston Community Center Executive Director McKenzie Wren leads the artists through an exercise in asset mapping.
McKenzie Wren leads the Hatch pilot artists through an exercise in asset mapping.

McKenzie Wren: Mckenzie has a background in public health, alternative medicine and variety entertainment.  Since 2007, she has worked within the refugee community of Clarkston, GA – a community called “the most diverse square mile in the nation” by a NY Times article. She was previously the Executive Director of the Clarkston Community Center for six years. McKenzie uses arts-based and place-based strategies to bring about change. Her particular areas of focus are helping businesses and nonprofits strengthen culture through participatory processes and identify new processes for information and resource flow. She is a skilled facilitator who believes in the power of community to identify and solve its own problems.

The Hatch Training Intensive is specifically targeted towards readying artists to work in community-centric art projects in ways that are both sustainable and meaningful to all involved stakeholders. Deadline for application to the 2016 Fall Hatch Training Intensive is August 15th at 11:59pm. To learn more or to apply, see our Hatch Training Page.

Budgets, Contracts and Negotiation – Hatch Artists’ Blogs Part 3

Part of the ongoing Hatch blog series, today’s blogs are reflections by our Hatch artists on their experience from the previous weeks’ class by Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts and Business Council of Greater Boston. Staff recaps of the session is available on our blog.

For this class, we ask the artists to reflect on the following thoughts:

  • How has your previous experience in negotiation been similar to cultivating dating or cultivating romantic relationships? What personal style of negotiation do you lean towards based on your personality and past experience?
  • What are some of the barriers, perceived or real, that relate to your work in public art? Consider things like permitting, zoning, etc. What are some possible solutions?

We hope you enjoy their thoughtful responses!

In the past, I used to find myself in a much more protected state when it came to negotiation. It was an activity that I feared. I did not ever want to ask for more. I was more grateful just for the opportunity of the work. I thought negotiation brought conflict and needed wiser, expert like persons to contribute to good outcomes.

However, with maturity, personal and familial needs, as well as much observation of the development of short films and other artists’ works in progress, I feel I have a breadth of knowledge to stand more aware and less timid in negotiation spaces for contracts.

Artist Danielle Deadwyler.
Artist Danielle Deadwyler.

Just absorbing the notes from the session, the biggest striking statement is ‘we are always in negotiation’.  Also, rather than negotiating to defend, negotiating to build trust and relationships feels like a central key to growth as a creative business/entrepreneur. Negotiations are a series of questions…the diagnostics queries are pivotal. This makes me want to question everything more. I’m keen on getting clarity always. Even if it is something I think I know or have known in the past, understanding an individual’s or organizations desires behind their information may not be the same as when I first gained the information. Desires/wants change and shift according to individuals and entities. Always ask the questions!

My negotiations with people are definitely indicative in my physical reactions to them. I often recoil from authority or play super kind cards. These, too, are not characteristic of my choices in the last 3-5 years. I am aware it is not productive or leading me towards the kind of personal professional artistic growth I am desirous of.

I’m intent on practicing negotiations daily now. Practicing trust building and relationship foundation making are essential things I am more aware of day to day. I still want to know more specifically for contract building and relationships specifically for performance artists in institutional relationships. I’ve found in my research that institutions have less of a standard when dealing with artists of this kind. There are many challenges that occur for performance artists in these relationships.

I don’t doubt that this session’s notes will put me in a better position to protect as well as build trust in the contracts and agreements I come to in the future.

by Danielle Deadwyler

 

Budgets, Negotiations, and Contracts – Hatch Artists’ Blogs Part 2

Part of the ongoing Hatch blog series, today’s blogs are reflections by our Hatch artists on their experience from the previous weeks’ class by Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts and Business Council of Greater Boston. Staff recaps of the session is available on our blog.

For this class, we ask the artists to reflect on the following thoughts:

  • How has your previous experience in negotiation been similar to cultivating dating or cultivating romantic relationships? What personal style of negotiation do you lean towards based on your personality and past experience?
  • What are some of the barriers, perceived or real, that relate to your work in public art? Consider things like permitting, zoning, etc. What are some possible solutions?

We hope you enjoy their thoughtful responses!

Negotiation is similar to how I have experienced relationships, in that you often assume you know what the other person wants or needs and tend to have one way of dealing with conflict. Finding out what the other party really NEEDS and wants becomes more important than assessing what you think their interests are. Also figuring out what you actually need and what your interests are is important. Without breaking it down for yourself you may have assumed you knew what you needed too. If you are a person who finds solace/drive in styles like Winning, Compromise, Competing in your personal relationships, it may be worth investigating and challenging what it would look like to experience other styles in your negotiations. We discussed for example the benefits of a Collaborative style of negotiation included longer term solutions and more uncovered needs, but carried the tradeoff of requiring more time and commitment from both sides. Sounds like life, right?

Part of an exhibition by Hez Stalcup.
Part of an exhibition by Hez Stalcup.

Some important thoughts in assessing things legally were: What are your Values? What is the culture you are trying to create? If you want unity and mutuality then there is a way to incorporate that in how you are protecting your own rights and the rights of collaborators. In general it’s better to work it out early in the process and spell out details up front, which is not a dis-service at all — in fact the opposite, explicit expectations set a tone of respect, clarity and reciprocity.

Who owns this? became a very useful question, and clarified when something is under your copyright or not. Finding the right simple questions to ask as you go into a project with another artist, the City or Galleries for example, can provide a framework for what a legal document can look like.

My own hesitancy about what could legally be covered in an unconventional public event were alleviated when Jim referenced the reality that there are huge outdoor events (New Years Eve was his example) that constitute a million drunk people being covered by liability insurance. I realized that working with a broker is more about knowing what is important to you and less so about memorizing the exact kind of insurance or contracts you might need. Anything can be put into a contract, to come full circle — it’s knowing what your interests, and the interests of who will be affected by your work (hosts, participants, artists, audience, public) actually are. Which as it turns out, is not so different from the process that goes into making a well thought out art piece.

by Hez Stalcup

Budgets, Negotiations and Contracts – Hatch Artists’ Blogs Part 1

Part of the ongoing Hatch blog series, today’s blogs are reflections by our Hatch artists on their experience from the previous weeks’ class by Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts and Business Council of Greater Boston. Staff recaps of the session is available on our blog.

For this class, we ask the artists to reflect on the following thoughts:

  • How has your previous experience in negotiation been similar to cultivating dating or cultivating romantic relationships? What personal style of negotiation do you lean towards based on your personality and past experience?
  • What are some of the barriers, perceived or real, that relate to your work in public art? Consider things like permitting, zoning, etc. What are some possible solutions?

We hope you enjoy their thoughtful responses!

The session with Jim was quite the opposite of what I expected (completely arduous). In fact, Jim made the legal strategy of arts & business quite accessible, understandable and intriguing. Jim broke down legal matters pertaining to the rights of creative work, negotiation and contracts which gave me a clear perception of where I (and my art) fit within the world of suits and paperwork.

An adorable community participant to one of WIlliam Massey's recent public art projects.
An adorable community participant to one of WIlliam Massey’s recent public art projects.

When it came to negotiation, I gained tremendous insight in how to understand the pros and cons of certain negotiation styles. I was certainly more drawn to the mutual respect of collaborative negotiation verses an overpowering or submissive tactic. Relationship is everything to me, and as Jim emphasized, when you understand the ‘why’ of who you are speaking to, you will best reach a respectful and relational agreement.

Within the topic of contracts, the work-shopping and processing-through examples offered huge insight in what wandering eyes might overlook in the fine-print. Such as how to identify language which either indicates or eradicates artists’ rights to the final product, reproductions, marketing, etc.. With my personal background of large-scale public artwork, it was thought-provoking to hear insight on insurance/liability, publicity, repairs and more. Basically I gained knowledge of how to vie for equal responsibility between myself and the other party. Also regarding budgets, Jim instilled a necessary and firm reminder to set parameters in place that many young artists may forget: taxes, insurance, contingency, documentation, legal fees, etc. I absolutely needed a kick in the butt that “artist fee” is way too broad and leaves the artists scraping personal funds to cover the inevitable additional costs.

Basically, this was an excellent workshop which addressed most things that artists tend to neglect. But even better, the topics were presented in a graspable way that made me feel capable in a realm that was once completely daunting.

By William Massey III

Hatch Session #5 Recap – Budgets, Negotiations and Contracts

One thing I always tell my students when they take Ignite is that cultivating a good relationship with your lawyer is invaluable. Luckily for us, and our Hatch artists, Jim Grace is the kind of lawyer at the forefront of the legal issues faced by artists. Jim is the Executive Director of the Arts and Business Council of Greater Boston, and we were incredibly fortunate to have his expertise to guide our latest Hatch session. Here are some highlights from the day:

IMG_9796 edited
Jim Grace, Executive Director of the Arts and Business Council of Greater Boston, schools us on how to best legally protect our artistic interests.

Intellectual Property: Jim began with an in-depth primer on intellectual property and some of the ways it can be protected. Of the three most widely used protections against infringement (copyright, trademark and patent), copyright and trademark were of the most interest to the artists, with several questions voiced about both. Jim helped not only to clearly define the differences between the two, but also to define the legal implications and responsibilities of the artist for each. As it relates to art created with community, Jim stressed that if the overall vision of the work is the providence of the artist, and not the individuals, then each individual can only hold claim to the their small piece. The work as a whole and vision is the intellectual property of the artist. Jim also discussed additional ways for artists to protect themselves, including filing for copyright and defining terms such as “work for hire” in which case the artist might not actually own the rights to work created for another entity. Alternatives to litigation if infringement was unintended were mentioned, including when to let the violation “go”, such as cases where the overall exposure or popularity of the piece was of greater benefit to the artist’s career.

Michael Jones (left) discusses his experiences with negotiation while Orion Cook (right) looks on.
Michael Jones (left) discusses his experiences with negotiation while Orion Cook (right) looks on.

Negotiation:

A lot of our conversation for the day revolved around negotiation, particularly because as artists, we are negotiating constantly. Highly stressed in this segment was the need to not only identify your personal negotiation “default”, but also to recognize the “default” of your negotiation partner. Typical negotiation prejudices and myths were debunked, resulting in greater understanding of the implications past experience might have in hindering a current collaboration process. Jim asked everyone to participate in a short exercise with a partner to recognize our own negotiation practices. Standing across from each other in two rows, each pair was told that in order to receive $1000, they must convince their partner, in one minute, to come to their side. Each person’s natural negotiation style became readily apparent as we dissected the effectiveness of each group’s communication and outcome. Jim also identified 5 different strategies for negotiation, the implications on the overall relationship between the partners involved and the best uses of each strategy depending upon the intended outcome. A strategy such as avoidance might seem merely negative, however could be useful in certain situations, such as responding to certain types of negative correspondance. Conversely, the strategy of collaboration gave much greater importance to overall relationship building and resulted in a better overall outcome for both parties with less opportunity to “leave money on the table”.

How could we decipher which strategy to use? And how could we reach the best outcome through collaboration, if that was our intent? To answer those questions, it was important for the artists to understand the differences between Interests and Positions, and to ask the “right” diagnostic questions. An interest is a want brought to the table by a negotiating party, but it may not always represent the need from which it comes. As an example, we were given a prompt regarding asking to rent an apartment. One side of the room was charged with asking for an apartment on the 14th floor and the other was charged with answering their needs. Jim challenged the artists to think beyond just the questions being asked by each side, but to probe each interest fully to understand the underlying need behind it. In this instance, the interest of the 14th floor apartment may be based on the need to be farther away from the street and noise, which could easily be satisfied by another higher floor apartment if none were available on the 14th floor. Having the insight and tenacity to go beyond just the stated interests of the other party meant that each side brings more to the table with which to negotiate. Both parties are more likely not only to satisfy each other needs, but to build a stronger, more trusting relationship as well. And ultimately, the most successful negotiations tend to yield this relational outcome as well as solving the problems of each side.

Orion Crook (standing - left) and William Massey (standing - right) consider possible scenarios regarding artistic participation during a proposed project scenario.
Orion Crook (standing-left) and William Massey III (standing-right) consider possible models for artist participation while workshopping project scenarios.

Contracts, Proposals and Budgets:

In order to best understand the kinds of projects and work agreements our artists had dealt with in the past, Jim asked that they submit any contracts and budgets that they felt comfortable sharing to be discussed and potentially workshopped prior to attending his workshop. Our artists vulnerably shared several different work agreements, proposals and projects, even volunteering information regarding some “in the works” collaborations. Jim stressed that not only were concerns regarding protection of artwork and assets important, but that the artists consider their needs for insurance, liability, tax and overhead expenses when creating budgets and negotiating contracts. The artists considered a wide variety of scenarios: from needs for maintenance and upkeep of artwork to considering the repercussions and difficulties of utilizing unorthodox performance spaces. Also noted was need to consider whether the contract created reflects any perceptions about one party or the other being “screwed”. While it is important to protect our assets and insure that clear expectations are maintained, if an artist preparing a work meant to connect and engage community then asks those same stakeholders to sign lengthy, overcomplicated releases, this action might not engender the intended result of the project.