Tag: National Women’s History Project

Nominate a Leading Lady

Nominate a Leading Lady in the arts for National Women's History Month.

C4 Atlanta is proud to announce the return of our Leading Ladies blog series in support of National Women’s History Month. National Women’s History Month is a project of the National Women’s History Project.  This blog series celebrates female-identifying individuals in our community who are super stars and worthy of distinction for their work in the arts.

Nominations for this series are now open and ongoing until February 28th. Anyone can nominate a Leading Lady! We want to know: “Who are the women that inspire you?” Arts workers in all disciplines can be nominated, including arts administrators. To nominate, please fill out the nomination form:

CLICK HERE TO NOMINATE A LEADING LADY

Nominees will be featured here on our blog throughout the month of March, starting March 1. Check back to see all of the amazing folks who break down barriers, build community, inspire, inform, and entertain the people of Atlanta through the arts.

 

Ife Williams Discusses Women Leading Socially Engaged Art

As you may know, March is National Women’s History Month. Last year, C4 Atlanta shared the stories of women arts administrators in our city as part of a project with the National Women’s History Project called “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives”.

C4 Atlanta is excited to curate this blog series for the second year in a row! We will be highlighting women’s stories on our blog and on our social media throughout the month of March and into April. This year we have expanded the project to include

Ife Williams,
Ife Williams, Executive Director at the Hudgens Center for the Arts

the stories of more women and to share a diverse range of experiences, including women nationally as well as locally. Sharing women’s triumphs challenges stereotypes within today’s society and overturns social assumptions about who women are and what women can accomplish.

With that being said, we’d love to introduce our next leading lady, Ife Williams.

Where do you work and what do you do?

I am a sculptor and the Executive Director at the Hudgens Center for the Arts.

What did you think you were going to be when you grew up?

An artist.

Who was your favorite artist/writer/performer growing up?

The earliest favorite artist I can remember was Degas. He was soon followed by Georgia O’Keefe, Arshile Gorky, Rothko, Pollock, Brancusi and Henry Moore, all before I graduated from high school.

Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you?

My mother is without a doubt the biggest influence on my life as an artist. She gave me my first art lessons, teaching me to draw what I saw rather than what I knew and she never made me feel that pursuing a career in the arts was anything to reconsider.

When and how did you first become interested in the arts?

I can’t remember a time that I wasn’t interested in the arts. I remember going to the art museum with my mother and sisters, when I was still in single digits, and I remember my sisters getting tired of being there long before I was.

Hudgens Center for the Arts
Hudgens Center for the Arts

 

How long have you been in your line of work?

Twenty-two years in arts administration, forever as an artist.

How is art a passion for you?

Art offers opportunities for me to connect to the world around me through unique vantage points. The emotion, energy and narrative that can be contained in each piece is endless. A single piece of art can offer new insights each time it is experienced and the conversations that can come from two differing perceptions is what draws me to art. It is what makes every exhibition, every studio visit and every artist talk a memorable experience. For me, it is inspiring to watch others engage with new genres, styles, content, and mediums. It is inspiring to see how perspectives shift as artworks are shown within varied contexts: alongside other artists, in unexpected venues and against unforeseen backdrops. The deepest connections are made with art and artists in an instant and witnessing that instant is amazing.

What are your thoughts on equality and representation of women in the arts?

Women working in the arts face the same gender equality challenges faced by women in other fields. Quite often, gender challenges are magnified in the arts because regardless of a woman’s role in the art world there are so many opportunities to be seen as a sexualized object that is intended as entertainment, not to be taken seriously. At the same time, unlike many fields, women in the arts have the opportunity to bring these issues to the forefront of their work. Socially engaged artwork provides an opportunity to push audiences to confront inequities and open dialogues that would otherwise be avoided or ignored and more and more often these works are finding a place in galleries, museums and private collections around the world.

What in your profession has given you the greatest satisfaction or fulfillment?

I have received the greatest satisfaction from being in the position to nurture projects that connect studio artists with communities to develop meaningful permanent installations. The success of these projects is most evident in the response of the community to the newly installed works. There is so much learning and discovery throughout the process. I have also enjoyed bringing artists together to discover each other’s works and share approaches to their mediums, communities and audiences.

Ife's hands hard at work throwing clay
Ife’s hands hard at work throwing clay

Looking back, what would you have done differently?

I make it a practice not to look back with regret and as an arts administrator, I believe the path I have taken has brought me to where I am today. Of course every moment has not been perfect but I am happy with where I am and I’m proud of the journey it took to get here.

As an artist, I would’ve explored ceramics as a medium earlier and I would’ve dedicated a number of years to experience more residency opportunities, domestically and abroad.

What would you do again?

I would fall in love with art as a child and share my love for the arts at every opportunity. I would encourage others to engage in the arts as lovers, learners and leaders.

What most excites you about the arts in Atlanta?

The depth and range of the artists in the Atlanta arts community excites me as do the  innovative exhibition spaces that continue to evolve alongside ever-changing engagement strategies. No matter how long I am here and no matter how many artists I meet or how many exhibitions I see, there is always a new voice, a new spin, a new artists’ collective to sit down with and in most cases all that newness comes with a familiar face. I love the mix of new and old, not unlike the phoenix, the Atlanta arts community is continually renewing, revisiting, and rejuvenating from its heart.

What do you hope to contribute to the Atlanta arts community?

I strive to expand the reach of our local arts community by developing programming that stretches beyond the metro region, connects artists with communities and encourages everyone to engage in the arts.

Where can I learn more about your organizations and work?

www.thehudgens.org

20150924_073559-1
A study from Ife’s ‘Enlightenment Series’

Bio:

While she has served in her capacity as Executive Director of the Jacqueline Casey Hudgens Center for the Arts since January 2016, Ms. Williams joined the Atlanta arts community in 2005 as the Public Art Program Coordinator with Fulton County Arts and Culture, (FCAC). She went on to manage the Contracts for Services Program and held the positions of Deputy Director of Arts & Culture (acting), and Interim Director of Arts and Culture. Through her tenure at FCAC she learned what it means to serve the public, facilitate genuine community engagement, and provide guidance to elected officials. Her professional experience includes the role of museum curator at the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens (Miami); development consultant at the Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator (Miami); assistant collections registrar for the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington (Seattle); and most recently Program Development Specialist at Fulton County Arts and Culture (Atlanta). Ms. Williams holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in Sculpture/Metalsmithing from the University of Michigan, pursued her master’s degree in Museum Studies at Syracuse University, and received a certificate of nonprofit organizational management from the Georgia Center for Nonprofits.

Collins Goss Talks About Raising Awareness for Atlanta Arts

As you may know, March is National Women’s History Month, and yesterday was International Women’s Day. Last year, C4 Atlanta shared the stories of women arts administrators in our city as part of a project with the National Women’s History Project called “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives”.

C4 Atlanta is excited to curate this blog series for the second year in a row! We will be highlighting women’s stories on our blog and on our social media throughout the month of March and into April. This year we have expanded the project to include the stories of more women and to share a diverse range of experiences, including women nationally as well as locally. Sharing women’s triumphs challenges stereotypes within today’s society and overturns social assumptions about who women are and what women can accomplish.

Collins Goss, Development Manager of Horizon Theatre
Collins Goss, Development Manager of Horizon Theatre

With that being said, we’d love to introduce our next leading lady, Collins Goss.

Where do you work and what do you do? I work as the Development Manager for the Horizon Theatre Company. I am in charge of all of Horizon’s fundraising efforts, including the annual fund, major gifts, foundation grants, government contracts for services, and special events. I also work closely with our Board of Directors, and I do a chunk of the project management work for Horizon’s community-based projects.

What did you think you were going to be when you grew up? Honestly, I never really had a set goal. Most kids would list teacher, nurse, vet, doctor, but I never had a specific thing that I knew I wanted to do.

Who was your favorite artist/writer/performer growing up? I loved to read growing up, so most of my favorite artists were writers. I could not get enough of L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables series as a teenager. I really, really loved classic lit like Little Women, To Kill a Mockingbird, Peter Pan, Little House on the Prairie, etc.

Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you? I have been so lucky to have had several wonderful influencers and mentors. I had two teachers in high school who blew my world wide open: one was from South Africa and one was from Queens. They somehow ended up teaching in South Georgia where I grew up, and they exposed me to a world much larger than I had known. My biggest influences, though, are definitely my parents. In my completely unbiased opinion, they are the greatest people on earth who give and love unconditionally and who get up every day to make the world better even when it is really hard and no one says thank you. They taught (and still teach) me so many things, but “thank you” was a big one. Everyone is worthy of your attention and gratitude no matter who they are.

When and how did you first become interested in the arts? How long have you been in your line of work? I took dance lessons from preschool through high school. I wasn’t very good, but I enjoyed it and still enjoy being a dance patron. I got into theatre the way a lot of kids do: my friends in high school were in the one act play and spring musical. I wanted in on the fun too. The alternative was playing basketball or jumping hurdles, and no one wants me to do either one. Yikes. I think I started unofficially working in some aspect of arts admin in high school and just never stopped. I am still not quite sure how that happened.

How is art a passion for you? Art is something that you can enjoy all of your life, and there is always a new show, art form, or artist to discover. The ability to keep discovering is what makes art a passion for me.

What are your thoughts on equality and representation of women in the arts? I work in an office of all women, and this has been the norm in most of my jobs in arts admin. I don’t know if that is typical or not, but I think it is awesome. Working in the arts full time is not easy. The hours can be long and the days frustrating, but women get stuff done and totally defy the odds. 🙂

Horizon Theatre presents Avenue Q to local audiences at Piedmont Park
Horizon Theatre presents Avenue Q to local audiences at Piedmont Park

What in your profession has  given you the greatest satisfaction or fulfillment? Looking back, what would you have done differently? What would you do again? The first thing that comes to mind is working on Theatre in the Park last summer. Horizon produced Avenue Q in Piedmont Park for a five night run in June 2015. That’s right. We produced a full scale Broadway musical outside in the middle of Atlanta in June with 28 puppets, a band, and 11 actors. Most of the tickets were given away for free, and we had more than 7700 people join us in the park that week. Moments like this are the reason I got into this business. All these people from all over the Atlanta area left their houses and Netflix to come outside, sit on a blanket, eat a picnic, and watch puppets sing about growing up and finding their purpose. Would I do it again? Heck yes.

What most excites you about the arts in Atlanta? Atlanta artists and administrators just make it happen in Atlanta, and their work is amazing. No one seems to take no for an answer, and I think that is pretty cool. There has been a lot of talk about Atlanta’s public art scene, and I am really excited to see what comes out of this. We have tons of space that could benefit from an art intervention: the Little Five Points plaza (Horizon is tackling this one starting in April, so stay tuned!), MARTA stations, and so many more.

What do you hope to contribute to the Atlanta arts community? I would really like to be a part of raising awareness of all the arts offerings in Atlanta and the impact the arts have on our communities. There are several individuals and arts organizations that are committed to advocating for the arts whether it is on the government level, among business leaders, or with individual patrons. I am really excited about an audience development project I am working on with the Atlanta Intown Theatre Partnership (AITP). AITP is made up of Horizon, 7 Stages, Actor’s Express, the Atlanta Shakespeare Tavern and Theatrical Outfit, and we are committed to pooling resources and doing things together that we could not do as individual theatres. Currently we want to raise live theatre going as a top of mind thing to do among 20-40 year olds who live/work/play along the Atlanta Beltline. We are still in the very early stages of the project, but I see tremendous potential for success.

Where can I learn more about your organizations and work (websites, social media, etc.)?

www.horizontheatre.com

Twitter: @horizontheatre

Facebook: Horizon Theatre Company

Instagram: @horizontheatre

Little Five Arts Alive Program launching in April 2016: http://www.littlefiveartsalive.com/

Bio?

Collins Goss (Development Manager) joins the Horizon Theatre Company after working for the University of Alabama Department of Theatre and Dance. At UA Theatre & Dance, she served as the digital communications, marketing, and patron services managers throughout her three years. She has also worked for the Texas Shakespeare Festival and Rose of Athens Theatre in Athens, GA. No matter the location, audience development and communication have been the focus of her work, and she is excited to be a part of the staff and community at the Horizon Theatre. Collins completed her MFA in Theatre Management from the University of Alabama in December and has BA degrees in English and Theatre from the University of Georgia.

Aisha Bowden Discusses Being a Role Model in the Arts

As you may know, March is National Women’s History Month, and yesterday was International Women’s Day. Last year, C4 Atlanta shared the stories of women arts administrators in our city as part of a project with the National Women’s History Project called “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives”.

C4 Atlanta is excited to curate this blog series for the second year in a row! We will be highlighting women’s stories on our blog and on our social media throughout the month of March and into April. This year we have expanded the project to include the stories of more women and to share a diverse range of experiences, including women nationally as well as locally. Sharing women’s triumphs challenges stereotypes within today’s society and overturns social assumptions about who women are and what women can accomplish.

Aisha Bowden, Co-Founder of Atlanta Music Project and Conductor of the AMPlify Choir
Aisha Bowden, Co-Founder of Atlanta Music Project and Conductor of the AMPlify Choir

With that being said, we’d love to introduce our next leading lady, Aisha Bowden.

Where do you work and what do you do?

I am the Co-Director of the Atlanta Music Project.   AMP provides intensive music instruction to underserved youth right in their neighborhood. We believe that by building youth orchestras and choirs in Atlanta’s underserved neighborhoods, we are offering youth pathways to success.  At AMP, social change is the goal; music is the method. Within AMP, I Co-Founded AMPlify, the choral program of the Atlanta Music Project. That’s where I spend the majority of my time and energy.

What did you think you were going to be when you grew up?

From my earliest memories, I wanted to be a teacher.  I was turned on to the idea of becoming a music teacher by my high school band director.  Who was your favorite artist/writer/performer growing up? Numerous: Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson. I loved playing Bach as a child.

Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you?

Again numerous. Other than my parents, my cooperating teacher during student teaching in college held the biggest influence on me.  I thought being a school music teacher meant coming in and doing the same thing every day.  Her students performed all over Washington, DC, and she created innovative programs and performance opportunities for them. She really opened my eyes to the possibilities.

Aisha accompanying at the piano.
Aisha accompanying at the piano.

When and how did you first become interested in the arts? How long have you been in your line of work?

I’ve been interested in the arts for as long as I can remember.  As a baby, I would bang on the pew in front of me to mimic the organist in church. I was fascinated by his ability to shift the energy in the building.  We purchased a piano when I was 4 and I started lessons soon after. I started performing as a child and began conducting choirs as a teenager. I was a piano kid, a band kid and a choir kid – but of course, choir was number one.

How is art a passion for you?

Art is my lifeline.  It is my purpose and my calling.  Through it, I am allowed to empower the most vulnerable amongst us – our youth. I am an activist by nature and I live to lift up those around me. My role at AMP allows me to fuse my passion for creativity with my compassion for others.

Aisha performs in a jam session with the Atlanta Music Project staff.
Aisha performs in a jam session with the Atlanta Music Project staff.

What are your thoughts on equality and representation of women in the arts?

As a businesswoman, I serve as an advocate for women in the arts through my daily work. I recognize my privilege in being able to represent my organization in the company of male-led businesses. It is my honor to serve as an example for not only the children in my program, but for some members of my staff as well.

What in your profession has  given you the greatest satisfaction or fulfillment? Looking back, what would you have done differently? What would you do again?

Looking back, my greatest moments of satisfaction have come when I see youth being transformed before my eyes due to choral performance.  When I see a child on stage filled with pride and self-confidence, I know that we are doing our job.

What most excites you about the arts in Atlanta?

I love living in a city that is buzzing with excitement as it relates to the arts. Atlanta’s arts community is alive and well.  The city embraces the artists, and gives them space to impact the city.

Members of the AMPlify Choir after a performance at Old Fourth Ward Park on the Atlanta Beltline.
Members of the AMPlify Choir after a performance at Old Fourth Ward Park on the Atlanta Beltline.

What do you hope to contribute to the Atlanta arts community?

I hope to develop an arts organization that impacts not just the youth in the community or Atlanta schools, but makes a mark on the Atlanta music scene in general.

Where can I learn more about your organizations and work (websites, social media, etc.)?

Www.atlantamusicproject.org

https://www.facebook.com/AtlantaMusicProject

https://twitter.com/ATLmusicproject

https://www.instagram.com/atlmusicproject/

https://twitter.com/AishaATL

https://www.facebook.com/aisha.bowden

https://www.instagram.com/sheislife/

Bio?

Aisha Bowden is the Co-Founder and Director of AMPlify, the Choral Program of the Atlanta Music Project. In this role, she overseas all AMPlify operations and directs the AMPlify Choir. In addition she holds strategic and administrative responsibilities for the AMP.

Aisha completed the Sistema Fellows program in 2012, a prestigious, post-graduate fellowship of New England Conservatory that trains gifted musicians and educators to lead El Sistema-inspired programs in the United States.

Prior to the fellowship, Aisha enjoyed a career as an award-winning public school music educator for eleven years.  As Chair of the Music Department at Thomson Elementary School in Washington, DC , Ms. Bowden provided General and Vocal Music Instruction to the full student body, directed the Thomson Choir and managed several partnerships with leading arts organizations, to include the Washington National Opera and The Choral Arts Society of Washington, DC.

Her performance background, which includes travel to Switzerland, Germany and Gabon, Africa, inspired Ms. Bowden to organize frequent performance opportunities for her students, designed to broaden their exposure to and understanding of the world around them. Under her direction, the Thomson Choir performed for the King and Queen of Norway, Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton and the Bicentennial Celebration of Abraham Lincoln at which President Obama was the keynote speaker. The Thomson choir has appeared on CNN, C-SPAN and Good Morning America as well as local television networks. During her tenure in the DC Public School system, Ms. Bowden also served as accompanist for the All-City Honors Chorus and a General Music Curriculum Writer for the DCPS Division of Music. Additionally, Ms. Bowden has been recognized for excellence in arts education by the Arts for Every Student Program, Who’s Who in American Educators and the Mayors Arts Awards. She is also featured in the April 2012 issue of Teaching Music, a publication of the National Association for Music Education.

After relocating from Washington,DC to Georgia in 2009, Ms. Bowden conducted middle school choirs with Cobb County Public Schools and worked as a Choral Teaching Artist for the pilot year of the Atlanta Music Project (AMP). That experience with AMP influenced her decision to enroll in the 2011-2012 Sistema Fellows Program and subsequently create the first Sistema-inspired choral program in Georgia. Aisha brings expertise in choral directing, public school education, community programming and non-profit management.

 

Celebrating Leading Ladies in the Arts

As you may know, March is National Women’s History Month, and yesterday was International Women’s Day. Last year, C4 Atlanta shared the stories of women arts administrators in our city as part of a project with the National Women’s History Project called “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives”.

C4 Atlanta is excited to curate this blog series for the second year in a row! We will be highlighting women’s stories on our blog and on our social media throughout the month of March and into April. This year we have expanded the project to include the stories of more women and to share a diverse range of experiences, including women nationally as well as locally. Sharing women’s triumphs challenges stereotypes within today’s society and overturns social assumptions about who women are and what women can accomplish.

IMG_9320With that being said, we’d love to introduce our first leading lady, Catherine Pfitzer.

 

Where do you work and what do you do?

I’m the Executive Director of Voices of Note, Inc, the non-profit that produces the Atlanta Gay Men’s Chorus and the Atlanta Women’s Chorus.

What did you think you were going to be when you grew up?

I grew up in southern California, and attended the Orange County School for the Arts, where was trained as a singer and actress. I studied film and media in college and knew I’d be staying in the performing arts.

Who was your favorite artist/writer/performer growing up?

Idina Menzel was my idol in high school.

catherine 2Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you?

Two people have influenced my character to the greatest degree, and they couldn’t be more opposite in nature from each other. My father is an analytical mechanical engineer, and President of a thriving business he founded 25 years ago. He is often the smartest person in the room, and he taught to apply logic to every situation. He also taught me how to win at Texas Hold ‘em… unless he is at the table, in which case my best defense is to avoid sitting to his right. This, along with being the only girl amongst my three brothers, taught me – above all – to be resilient, and never accept defeat.

Secondly, my mother is an artist of many disciplines; she is highly creative and intuitive. She is loving, affectionate, sensitive, and at times, emotional. It wasn’t until I was over 30 that I realized she had taught me the meaning of unconditional love. Not in an identifiable, specific lesson, per se, but by setting a daily example of being sensitive, welcoming and graceful, without giving up one iota of her strong warrior spirit. She is one of the most amazing women I have ever known.

When and how did you first become interested in the arts? How long have you been in your line of work?

I moved from Southern California to the south to finish college, and I quickly experienced culture shock when I discovered (comparatively) how few opportunities there were for performing artists and filmmakers. As a performer myself, I wanted an outlet for my own artistic expression, and I decided to be proactive about creating such opportunities. While still in college in Birmingham, AL, I started an improvisational comedy troupe, the first of its kind in the city. While casting collaborators, I quickly discovered the vast untapped talent pool that existed there. There were artists desperately thirsting for outlets and opportunities, in what I would call a cultural desert. After college, I started working at the Sidewalk Film Festival as its program manager, and it was then that I was hooked on arts administration. That is, providing previously nonexistent opportunities for artists to express, present, and hone their talents felt so intrinsically good that I felt I had found my calling. I went on to become the Executive Director of that organization, and later moved to Atlanta to continue my journey.

How is art a passion for you?

My love of performance aside, there are two primary reasons that I’m passionate about art:

1) Because it inspires us to change.

2) Because we need it to survive.

I believe that art in all its forms is one of the most direct influences on social change. When individuals are made to truly feel, or are swept up by a powerful experience, it has the capability to inspire them to self-reflection that sometimes causes them to see life more openly than they previously had.

It’s been said that art – especially music – does not function in society as mere luxury or entertainment. Throughout history, example after example can be cited of works of music and art created in the most unimaginable environments —amidst famine, oppression, genocide. In historical circumstances where these victims were without food or shelter — without money, without hope, without recreation, without basic respect — they were not without art. Leading us to the obvious conclusion that art is as necessary as any other survival tool.

This sentiment is resonates in Voices of Note’s upcoming work, the first ever joint concert between its two choruses, the Atlanta Gay Men’s Chorus and the Atlanta Women’s Chorus. And Justice For All runs March 18-19th.

What are your thoughts on equality and representation of women in the arts?

It is fitting that I’m answering these questions on International Women’s Day! I could write novels about how this permeates the arts. In short, I believe that the national trends (a glass ceiling of 78%) we see in the workplace carry over into the arts and its equality.

Women are underrepresented in the working world as musicians and in top administrative leadership positions. But further, when they are in these roles, comparatively speaking, women are encouraged to present their ideas with an unparalleled amount of grace and diplomacy, not just so that these ideas are heard, but simply in order to thrive in the workplace. Don’t get me wrong – I’m a big believer of grace and diplomacy, and these are tools I’ve deliberately worked at developing and will continue to as long as I live. But I’m also a big believer in efficiency. It is true for any person – male or female — that the most effective way to deliver a message is not always the most efficient. In sum, the same message or idea coming from a male leader may be received one way, but a female leader delivering the same message in the same manner often is not responded to as favorably.

What in your profession has given you the greatest satisfaction or fulfillment? Looking back, what would you have done differently? What would you do again?

As stated previously, providing opportunities for artists to present their art and for audiences to witness it gives me the most satisfaction. What would I have done differently? I would have learned earlier in my career that knowing the right solution is not the most important factor, ever. Building consensus is.

What most excites you about the arts in Atlanta? 

The multitude of opportunities there are to experience it! That and the very supportive, collaborative nature the arts organizations have as a whole.

What do you hope to contribute to the Atlanta arts community?

As I said, I love the fact that every day my job – in the macro sense – is to create opportunities for artists. Whether it is stabilizing revenue sources, redesigning a staff structure, or writing a strategic plan: all of these contribute to the ultimate goal above.

Where can I learn more about your organizations and work (websites, social media, etc.)?

Voices of Note’s upcoming work is the first ever joint concert between its two choruses, the Atlanta Gay Men’s Chorus and the Atlanta Women’s Chorus. And Justice For All runs March 18-19th.

www.voicesofnote.org

 

catherine 3

 

Your Bio?

Catherine Pfitzer, Executive Director, joined the Voices
of Note family in early 2014. Catherine’s passion for musical
performance began at a young age and grew through training
at the Orange County School of Arts. She served as the Executive
Director of the Sidewalk Film Festival in Birmingham, founding
many of the organization’s affiliated programs, including the
Birmingham SHOUT LGBT+Film Festival (co-founder). She moved
to Atlanta in 2009 to work with 7 Stages Theatre as its Director
of Development.