Tag: TRG Arts

The Next Round of Add-in Dates – Arts & Culture Census

Is your organization doing everything it can to understand its audience? Do you do what other types of arts activities your audience members are participating in?

From a recent study published by the Wallace Foundation about arts marketing:

Arts organizations that want to build their audiences need to understand their audiences. That requires market research, and a number of conference participants talked about how gathering data – through focus groups, surveys or other methods – had been crucial to their work.

New Organizations may join the Arts & Culture Census group this May. The deadline to submit data is May 4, 2012. To join your peers from over 20 area arts organizations, email Jessyca@c4atlanta.org.

What does the Arts & Culture Census offer your organization?A picture of a man next to a blackboard. Above his head are the words "target your patrons." An arrown is drawn on the blackboard. The arrow looks like it is going through his head.

The purpose of the Arts & Culture Census is to:

  • Simplify mailing list exchanges
  • Share list hygiene expenses
  • Identify a targeted, qualified and focused group of arts consumers
  • Examine consumer behavior through comparative market analysis

Lists can be traded with just a few clicks. The list exchange is permission-based and completely secure. Read the A&C Census FAQ online at C4Atlanta.org.

22 Participating Organizations

Academy Theatre • Artworks! Gwinnett • Atlanta Ballet • Atlanta Jewish Music Festival • Atlanta Lyric Theatre • Atlanta Opera • Atlanta Shakespeare Company • Brooks & Company Dance • CORE • C4 Atlanta • Essential Theatre • Full Radius Dance • Georgia Ballet • Georgia State School of Music • Kennesaw State University College of the Arts • MINT Gallery • North Fulton Drama Club • Rialto Center for the Arts • Schwartz Center for Performing Arts • Serenbe Playhouse • Synchronicity Theatre • WonderRoot

Additional Information

In 2012, we will expand this program to include:

  • Training workshops
  • Relevant panel discussions
  • User Group Meetings
  • Blog site for the Arts & Culture Census users – articles, best practices, & more!
  • Hosting TRG Arts in Atlanta for a special training session with members

Join your peers today. Email jessyca@c4atlanta.org today!

It’s 8 PM. Do you know where your patrons are?

The Atlanta Arts & Culture Census can help you find them!

Arts patrons look board watching T.V.
Your Arts Patrons

Join your peers in the Atlanta Arts & Culture Census this March. The Arts & Culture Census is brought to our community through a partnership with TRG Arts, one of America’s most respected marketing consulting companies. Nearly 400,000 unique arts patron households currently represented!

We will be adding more companies to the Arts & Culture Census March 2, 2012. The deadline to express interest in being a part of the Arts & Culture Census is Friday, February 17, 2012.

What can the Arts & Culture Census do for my organization?

  • Get to know your patrons
  • Discover how to find new patrons
  • Secure list trading with your peers in just a few clicks of the mouse
  • Identify areas of growth and collaboration within the Atlanta region
  • Pull instant demographic reports for board meetings, grant proposals & more

How do I join the Arts & Culture Census?
Fill out this short interest form!

What do your peers think?

Atlanta Ballet has been both a consultant and database client of TRG since 2005.  TRG’s knowledge of performing arts marketing and specific focus on database marketing have been invaluable.  Their eMerge product has allowed Atlanta Ballet to create an aggressive direct communications marketing plan using mail, email and phone as methods to stay in touch with our existing and future patrons.   The launch of a community arts database in Atlanta will allow us to continue to grow strong arts patrons by reaching out to non-ballet patrons, and allowing other organizations to connect with Atlanta Ballet patrons., creating stronger arts patrons who crossover multiple Atlanta arts organizations. -Tricia Ekhom, The Atlanta Ballet

Although we had a broad understanding of our Schwartz Center arts patrons, we didn’t have much real data to support our media buys and who we were targeting. Once our info was loaded in TRG, I could easily print out demographic reports–showing zip codes and demographics like age, income and buying habits. Some of the research data was surprising to us; particularly the average age being a bit younger than we thought. The Arts & Culture Census has also made requesting mail lists from other arts organizations a breeze. – Jessica Cook, Emory Arts, Schwartz Center for Performing Arts

Organizations currently participating in the Atlanta Arts & Culture Census (as of 01/16/2012)

  • Academy Theatre
  • ArtWorks! Gwinnett
  • Atlanta Ballet
  • Atlanta Jewish Music Festival
  • Atlanta Lyric Theatre
  • Atlanta Opera
  • Brooks & Company Dance
  • CORE Performance Company
  • Essential Theatre
  • Full Radius Dance
  • Georgia State University School of Music
  • Kennesaw State University College of the Arts
  • MINT Gallery
  • North Fulton Drama Club
  • Rialto Center for the Arts
  • Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts
  • Synchronicity Performance Group
  • The Georgia Ballet
  • The New American Shakespeare Tavern
  • WonderRoot

What is Psychographic Data & Why Should I Care About it?

How is this different from demographic information? How do I use this information?

I want to take a small moment of your time to define, “psychographic” data. I found a pretty simple description via “How Stuff Works.”  Why am I talking about pshchographic information? Because the Arts & Culture Census makes psychographic information available to participating arts organizations. Here is the type of information to expect. Get to know your audiences better!

Psychographics

Even though you may have determined your demographic group, people within that group still have very different perceptions about the benefits or value of your product and will be motivated for different reasons. These differences are known as psychographics. To further target your efforts, you’ve got to determine not only who buys (or will buy) your product, but what makes them want to buy it. Include as much psychographic information as you can dig up, such as what their spending patterns are, whether they are brand conscious when it comes to your product type, what influences their buying behavior, what promotional efforts they respond to most often, etc. You also want to know how they go about buying it and what you can do to encourage them to buy more. You need this information so you can, in effect, clone your best customers. It is important to really pick apart what motivates them to buy.

The information you glean from a journey into your target audience’s brain is often key to your marketing efforts, particularly the positioning of your product. It includes the audience’s activities, interests, and opinions. You have to work through behavioral factors, economic factors, and even interpersonal factors to get to the root of purchasing behavior. Answer these questions in your overview:

  • What do they like about your product?
  • What do they like about your competitor’s product?
  • What made them decide to buy your product?
  • Did they know which brand they were buying before they purchased it?
  • What advertising messages had they seen prior to buying?
  • How much disposable or discretionary income is available for this type of purchase?
  • What are their hobbies?
  • What emotional aspects impact their purchase?
  • What is their social class or status?
  • Who is the actual decision-maker for this type of purchase?
  • What values and attitudes play a part in this type of purchase?
  • Who do they look to when making purchasing decisions?

Now that you know your target market and market segments, define your market using concrete numbers and percentages. In other words, how many users do you currently have and how many potential users exist for your product or service? If you are offering a regional service and have found that there are 80,000 potential customers in your geographic area, then this is where you put that information.

Explain the growth and other changes you see in the market and how the competition is failing, flailing or flourishing as a result. Include some market history if it applies to your product and market. Refer to the statistics and data you’ve discovered through your market research and be sure to quote the source and date.